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Thursday, April 20
 

2:15pm

Christians
Clare O’Connor, “Justin Bieber’s Revelation: The Cultural Politics of Christian Authenticity”
Anthony Easton, “In a Dry Deseret: 19th Century Mormon Feminists, the Women's Christian Temperance Union, and Proto-Remix Culture”
Chris Estey and Jason E. Dodd, “Handing Tickets Out for God: An Esoteric History of Christian Rock”

Moderators
avatar for Jewly Hight

Jewly Hight

Twitter | | Writing from Nashville for the past dozen-plus years, music journalist and critic Jewly Hight is an NPR/NPR Music contributor and her work has also appeared in The New York Times, Billboard, Vulture.com, The Oxford American, and elsewhere. She has a Masters from Vanderbilt, where she focused on religion, gender, sexuality, and southern music; published Right By Her Roots: Americana Women and Their Songs in 2011; and is at work on her second book... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jason E. Dodd

Jason E. Dodd

Jason Dodd is co-author of the upcoming Feral House book, Handing Tickets Out for God: An Esoteric History of Christian Rock. A recovering Evangelical preacher’s kid, Jason once edited two alternative Christian music magazines during the 90s and 00s (HM and BANDOPPLER). Currently... Read More →
avatar for Anthony Easton

Anthony Easton

Anthony Easton is a writer, artist, and theologian. They are interested in class, sex, gender, and the west. They have been published in Spin, The Atlantic, Pitchfork, Globe and Mail, and others. They have presented at conferences throughout North America, and in Europe. Their art has been shown in Toronto, New York, Chicago, and is in the collection of the library of the National Gallery of Canada. They will start a PhD at the University of Aberdeen in 2017... Read More →
avatar for Chris Estey

Chris Estey

Twitter | | Chris Estey worked at Tooth & Nail Records from 1999–2002, and was the Editor-in-Chief of Fuel Magazine for that label before co-founding BANDOPPLER Magazine with paper co-presenter Jason E. Dodd. Both of them live in Seattle, Washington, and have a book about this subject coming out from Feral House in 2018. Dodd was editor of HM Magazine from... Read More →
CO

Clare O’Connor

Clare O’Connor is a doctoral student in Communication at the University of Southern California. She studies the latent liberatory content of popular music and its implications for contemporary social movements. Her publications include Keywords for Radicals: The Contested Vocabulary of Late-Capitalist Struggle (AK Press, 2016). Between 2008 and 2012 she served on the Editorial Committee of Upping The Anti: A Journal of Theory and Action. Her first album, Work Songs (2015), asks what we can salvage from personal loss and political despair... Read More →


Thursday April 20, 2017 2:15pm - 3:45pm
Learning Labs MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:15pm

Futurism
Jack Hamilton, “Living in a Future Paradise: Stevie Wonder’s Synthesizer Dreams”
Jason Heller, "Beyond Parliament: The Depth of Sci-Fi Funk in the ’70s”
Michelle Habell-Pallán, "‘Buen Vivir/The Good Life' with Chicas Rockeras South East Los Angeles and the Downtown Boys, ‘Malportado Kids: Sounds Like Chicanxfuturism’”

Moderators
JB

Jayna Brown

Twitter | | Jayna Brown is Associate Professor of English and Ethnic Studies at UC Riverside. Her first book, Babylon Girls: Black Women Performers and the Shaping of the Modern was published by Duke University Press in 2008. Her new book Black Utopias: Speculative Life and the Music of Other Worlds (under peer review at Duke University Press) traces black radical utopian practice and vision, from the psychic travels of Sojourner Truth to Sun... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Habell-Pallán

Michelle Habell-Pallán

Twitter | | Michelle Habell-Pallán, Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies, University of Washington, co-directs the Women Who Rock: Making Scenes, Building Communities Oral History Archive; curated American Sabor: Latinos in U.S. Popular Music (sponsored by MoPOP, UW, and the Smithsonian... Read More →
avatar for Jack Hamilton

Jack Hamilton

Twitter | | Jack Hamilton teaches in the departments of American Studies and Media Studies at the University of Virginia and is the author of Just around Midnight: Rock and Roll and the Racial Imagination (Harvard University Press, 2016). He is also the pop critic for Slate magazine, where he writes about music, sports, and other areas of culture. He is currently working on a cultural history of inhuman musical instruments since 1970... Read More →
avatar for Jason Heller

Jason Heller

Twitter | | Jason Heller is a Hugo Award-winning editor, book critic, and music journalist who has written for The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, Pitchfork, Entertainment Weekly, and NPR. He also writes science fiction and fantasy, and his nonfiction book Strange Stars: How Science Fiction Transformed Popular Music in the... Read More →


Thursday April 20, 2017 2:15pm - 3:45pm
JBL Theater MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:15pm

Noise in the Screen
Although music videos and late night talk shows no longer have the seemingly universal reach that they did on television only decades ago, both mediums persist and now circulate on the internet. The presenters on this panel explore the visualization of protest within hip-hop and indie pop culture in both a U.S and transnational context. They look at how the mediums of music video, live performance, and fashion in their internet circulation possess the potential to comment on and even intervene in current events, particularly in the wake of increased media coverage of Black death since Trayvon Martin’s murder in 2012 and racism and xenophobia at large during the coverage for the 2016 presidential election. The panelists specifically investigate where sound interrupts and intervenes, making declarations in addition to—or in the absence of—spoken commentary or lyrical enunciations. From digital synthesizers’ and drum machines’ vibrations to an unremarked Jay-Z track to late-night talk show walkovers, the presenters affirm that sound refuses to let artists and audience members forget the histories of suffering (and subsequent creativity) that visual and spoken news commentary so often wants to deaden.

Christine Capetola, “‘Cry and Burst My Deafness’: Blood Orange, Affective Bass Lines, and Viscerally Reconnecting with the 1980s”
Alyxandra Vesey, “Dragging with The Roots - The Walkover and the Limits of Dissent on Late-Night Television”
Meenasarani Linde Murugan, “SomewhereInAmerica: Sounding Brown Atlantics through Hijabi Fashionistas”

Moderators
MM

Michaelangelo Matos

Twitter | | Michaelangelo Matos is the author of The Underground Is Massive: How Electronic Dance Music Conquered America (Dey Street), Rolling Stone’s number-two music book of 2015, and the Off the Record columnist for Thump. He’s currently at work on a book on the pop landscape of 1984. He lives in St. Paul, Minnesota... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Christine Capetola

Christine Capetola

Christine Capetola is a PhD candidate in the Department of American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin and holds a M.A. in Performance Studies from New York University. Her doctoral research investigates how sound, affect, and vibration work as mediators for racial, gendered, and sexual identity, particularly in the case of artists who utilized the musical technologies of synthesizers and drum machines in the mid-1980s. Christine also writes about contemporary music on her blog Sound and Queery... Read More →
ML

Meenasarani Linde Murugan

Meenasarani Linde Murugan is an Assistant Professor of Screen Studies at Fordham University in the Department of Communication and Media Studies. Her manuscript, Gender and Race in Postwar Variety Television: Colorful Performance is under contract at Routledge and will be part of a new Gender, Media, and Sexuality series, edited by Mary Kearney. Her research interests include television, gender, race, media historiography, transnationalism, and fashion... Read More →
avatar for Alyxandra Vesey

Alyxandra Vesey

Alyxandra Vesey is a visiting assistant professor in Communication Studies and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the College of Wooster. Next fall, she will be joining the University of Alabama as an assistant professor in Journalism and Creative Media. Her research focuses on the intersection between gender, music culture, and media industries. She is currently working on a manuscript about the identity politics surrounding... Read More →


Thursday April 20, 2017 2:15pm - 3:45pm
Demo Lab MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

4:00pm

Artist Interview: A Conversation with David Byrne
Kick off Pop Conference 2017 with Artist Interview: A Conversation with David Byrne. This year’s conference theme is “Sign O’ the Times: Music and Politics” and Byrne will discuss his critically acclaimed musical Here Lies Love, which traces the non-violent restoration of democracy in the Philippines in 1986 and follows the meteoric rise and dramatic fall of the controversial First Lady of the Philippines, Imelda Marcos.

Speakers
avatar for David Byrne

David Byrne

David Byrne co-founded the band Talking Heads and created the record label Luaka Bop. Recent work includes: Joan of Arc: Into the Fire, a musical about the French warrior-saint that premiered at The Public Theater in March 2017; The Institute Presents: Neurosociety, an immersive... Read More →


Thursday April 20, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Sky Church MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

5:15pm

Early 20th Century Sweet and Hot
The politics of popular music performance lie in the details—how a singer utters a phrase with just the right amount of breathiness, transforming a trite lyric into a seductive power play; how a voice might sound “in between” masculine and feminine, stirring fears of gender crisis; how a band works a crowd into a dancing frenzy and in the process lays claim to public space that would otherwise be off limits. This panel explores the politics of pop performance during the early twentieth century, a period of major transformation along several fronts. Female artists were carving out new space for the expression of desire, while “crooning” male artists found that softening their voice and image brought both mass acceptance and derision. The declining (but not disappearing) influence of blackface signaled that racial boundaries were being redrawn, and the emergence of ragtime, jazz, and blues carried African American music to new levels of cultural awareness. Changes in media, in turn, shifted the very nature of pop performance, as the expanding reach of sound recordings, radio, and film supplemented voices and bodies on the stage.

Steve Waksman, “I Heard Buddy Bolden Say: Social Clubs and Musical Rivalries in New Orleans”
Lauren Sklaroff, “Sophie Tucker and Complexity of Live Performance”
Jody Rosen, “All My Life Is Just Despair: Torch Songs, Fallen Women, and the Politics of Degradation”
Allison McCracken, “Bobby Breen and the Cultural Work of the Boy Soprano”

Moderators
avatar for Daniel Goldmark

Daniel Goldmark

Daniel Goldmark is Professor of Music and directs the Center for Popular Music Studies at Case Western Reserve University. He is series editor of the Oxford Music/Media Series, and is the author and/or editor of several books on animation, film, and music. Goldmark also worked as an archivist and music coordinator at... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Allison McCracken

Allison McCracken

Twitter | | Allison McCracken is Associate Professor of American Studies at DePaul University in Chicago, and specializes in media studies, gender/sexuality studies, and American cultural history. She is the author of Real Men Don't Sing: Crooning in American Culture (Duke, 2015), and she has also written about U.S. media voices in American Music, the anthologies Soundtrack Available and The Radio Reader, and the online media journal Antenna... Read More →
avatar for Jody Rosen

Jody Rosen

Twitter | | Jody Rosen is writer at The New York Times Magazine. He was previously critic-at-large for T: The New York Times Style Magazine, the music critic for New York, Slate, and The Nation, and a senior critic at Rolling Stone. His new book, Two Wheels Good: A Bicycle History of the World, will be published by Crown in 2018... Read More →
avatar for Lauren Sklaroff

Lauren Sklaroff

Twitter | | Lauren Sklaroff is Associate Professor of History at the University of South Carolina, specializing in the History of Popular Culture and American Race Relations. She is now completing her second book, the first in-depth biography of Sophie Tucker entitled Wanting to Be Wanted: Sophie Tucker and the Creation of a Show Business Legend. Her first book, Black Culture and the New Deal: The Quest for Civil Rights in the Roosevelt Era (2009), explored federal cultural programming involving African Americans in the 1930s and 1940s... Read More →
avatar for Steve Waksman

Steve Waksman

Steve Waksman is Professor of Music and Sylvia Dlugasch Bauman Professor of American Studies at Smith College. His publications include the books Instruments of Desire: The Electric Guitar and the Shaping of Musical Experience (1999) and This Ain’t the Summer of Love: Conflict and Crossover in Heavy Metal and Punk (2009). Currently, he is writing a new book on the cultural history of live music and performance in the U.S., tentatively titled, Live Music in America: A History, 1850-2000... Read More →


Thursday April 20, 2017 5:15pm - 7:15pm
JBL Theater MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

5:15pm

Musicians In Action
Chris Molanphy, “Lifting My Voice, Plugging One Ear: The Post–Band-Aid History of the Communal-Singing Celebrity Megasingle—Chart Phenomenon, Crusading Pronouncement, Comic Punchline?”
Tim Quirk, “What I Learned in Jail”
Allison Hussey, “FU, HB2: Battles of Bands and Bathroom Bills”
Patrick St. Michel, “Japanese Music In The Post-Fukushima Era”

Moderators
MJ

Maura Johnston

Twitter | | Maura Johnston is a writer and editor who teaches at Boston College. She has written for The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Time, Billboard, and Rolling Stone; her byline also appeared in a number of publications that have succumbed to 21st century industry tumult. She lives in Boston... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Allison Hussey

Allison Hussey

Twitter | | Since 2010, Allison Hussey has been writing about music from her home state of North Carolina, but has been a voracious music consumer for much longer. Her current position is the music editor at INDY Week, the alt-weekly serving the large metropolitan area of Durham, Raleigh, and Chapel Hill. Hussey is deeply invested in local music and culture, with a sharp interest in learning about how they intersect with social justice issues and the thorny notion of Southern identity... Read More →
avatar for Patrick St. Michel

Patrick St. Michel

Twitter | | Patrick St. Michel is a writer based in Tokyo, who has been covering Japanese music since moving to the country in 2009. His work has appeared in The Japan Times, Pitchfork, The Fader, The Atlantic, and many more. He operates the Japanese music blog Make Believe Melodies, and he has written an entry in the upcoming 33 1/3 Japan series... Read More →
avatar for Chris Molanphy

Chris Molanphy

Twitter | | Chris Molanphy is a pop-chart analyst and critic who writes about the intersection of culture and commerce in popular music. He writes the “Why Is This Song No. 1?” series for Slate, and his work has also appeared in Pitchfork, NPR Music's The Record, Billboard, Rolling Stone, and CMJ. Chris is also a frequent guest on National Public Radio (Soundcheck, All Things Considered, Planet Money, On the Media) and on... Read More →
avatar for Tim Quirk

Tim Quirk

Twitter | | Tim Quirk spent more than 10 years as the singer and lyricist for the punk-pop band Too Much Joy. He’s also been a regular contributor to Raygun and The San Francisco Chronicle and overseen the music programming teams for Rhapsody and Google Play. His critical essays have been published in anthologies by the Oxford University Press, Best Music Writing 2010, and the academic journal Popular Music. Tim is currently one half of an electro-pop outfit called Wonderlick... Read More →


Thursday April 20, 2017 5:15pm - 7:15pm
Learning Labs MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

5:15pm

Peak Counterculture
Dan Booth and Heather Booth, “Songs My Mother Taught Me”
Nicolette Rohr, “‘The Folk Furor’: Women and Fandom in the Folk Revival”
Mairead Case, “Poetics: The Weather Underground”
Alex LaRotta, “Young, Gifted, and Brown: La Onda Chicana in San Antonio’s West Side Sound”

Moderators
avatar for Gus Stadler

Gus Stadler

Twitter | | Gus Stadler is Associate Professor of English at Haverford College. He is the author of a book, Troubling Minds: The Cultural Politics of Genius in the U. S. 1840-1890 and numerous articles on American literature and culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. From 2010 to 2013 he co-edited the Journal of Popular Music Studies with Karen Tongson. His current book project is tentatively titled Woody Guthrie and the Intimate Life of the... Read More →

Speakers
DB

Dan Booth

Dan Booth is a partner in the law firm Booth Sweet LLP, where he concentrates in copyright, trademark, defamation, and First Amendment litigation law. He loves the Pop Conference, where he has given presentations about his client George Clinton, Phil Ochs’ Elvis phase, last dances, Elonis v. United States, and @higherslystone... Read More →
HB

Heather Booth

Heather Booth, a leading strategist on progressive issue campaigns, has been an organizer since the civil rights, anti-war, and women’s movements in the 1960s. She was the founding director and is president of the organizing training center the Midwest Academy. She has managed political campaigns and was the Democratic National... Read More →
avatar for Mairead Case

Mairead Case

Twitter | | Mairead Case is a working writer, and a PhD candidate at the University of Denver, Summer Writing Program Coordinator at Naropa, and a teacher at these places and the Denver women’s jail. She wrote the novel See You In the Morning (featherproof) and Tenderness (Meekling), a poetry chapbook. An intersectional feminist, Mairead has been a legal observer with the NLG for over a decade, and writes and publishes widely on music, narrative, and politics... Read More →
avatar for Alex LaRotta

Alex LaRotta

Alex LaRotta is a first-generation Colombian-American and native Houstonian. An avid record collector and DJ, as well as a history PhD candidate at the University of Houston, his work focuses on popular music and cultural history in the American Southwest. His writings are currently featured in the Journal of Texas Music History, Houston History Magazine, and the Houston Chronicle, among other publications. He is currently working on his dissertation on San... Read More →
avatar for Nicolette Rohr

Nicolette Rohr

Nicolette Rohr is a PhD candidate in History at the University of California, Riverside. Her dissertation project explores popular music fandom among American women during the 1960s. She holds an MA in Public History and co-curated an exhibition of photographer Garry Winogrand’s Women are Beautiful at the California Museum of Photography in 2013. In 2015, she was a Gladys Kriebel Delmas Visiting Scholar at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Library and Archives in Cleveland, Ohio... Read More →


Thursday April 20, 2017 5:15pm - 7:15pm
Demo Lab MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

7:15pm

 
Friday, April 21
 

9:00am

Motown
On this 50th anniversary year of the Detroit Riots, our panel returns to one of the most visible and vexed interplays of American music and politics: Motown. Rather than reproduce the well-trod narratives of Motown’s ambivalent relationship to the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, this conversation seeks to understand Motown’s politics from its margins—the “small” voice of Diana Ross, the role that gospel played in ushering in its pop aesthetic, the impact of its black girl groups as they “invaded” Britain, and its one-off album by Martin Luther King. By foregrounding those moments in which the label either explicitly tied itself to or seemingly skirted around the edges of radical politics, we will reconsider what we actually mean by the “Motown sound,” and the role played by gender and genre in helping the label navigate the changing sound technologies and social movements of the 60s and early 70s.

Salamishah Tillet, “‘Since it was His Artistry and Performance’: MLK and Motown’s Commercial Civil Rights Sound”
Guthrie Ramsey, “Detroit Virtuosity and Motown’s Aesthetics of Integration”
Emily Lordi, “‘Love Child’: Diana Ross and the ‘Small’ Black Female Voice”
Gayle Wald, “Nowhere to Run: Girl Group Transnationalism”

Moderators
avatar for Jack Hamilton

Jack Hamilton

Twitter | | Jack Hamilton teaches in the departments of American Studies and Media Studies at the University of Virginia and is the author of Just around Midnight: Rock and Roll and the Racial Imagination (Harvard University Press, 2016). He is also the pop critic for Slate magazine, where he writes about music, sports, and other areas of culture. He is currently working on a cultural history of inhuman musical instruments since 1970... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Guthrie P. Ramsey, Jr.

Guthrie P. Ramsey, Jr.

Guthrie P. Ramsey, Jr. is the author of Race Music: Black Cultures from Bebop to Hip-Hop, The Amazing Bud Powell: Black Genius, Jazz History and the Challenge of Bebop and African American Music: Grove Music Essentials (Kindle Edition). As the leader of the band Dr. Guy’s MusiQology, he has released three CDs (Y the Q, The Colored Waiting Room and B Eclectic) and is editor and founder of the blog musiqology.com... Read More →
avatar for Emily Lordi

Emily Lordi

Twitter | | Emily J. Lordi is the author of Black Resonance: Iconic Women Singers and African American Literature (2013) and a 33 1/3 book on Donny Hathaway Live (2016). Her music and book reviews have appeared on such sites as Slate, The Root, The Fader, and the Los Angeles Review of Books. She is an associate professor of English at UMass-Amherst... Read More →
avatar for Salamishah Tillet

Salamishah Tillet

Twitter | | Salamishah Tillet is an associate professor of English and Africana Studies and a faculty member of the Alice Paul Center for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality at the University of Pennsylvania. She has appeared on the BBC, CNN, MSNBC, NPR, and PBS, and in Ebony and Essence, published articles with The Atlantic.com, Elle, The Chicago Tribune, The Guardian, The Nation, The Root, Time.com, and regularly contributes to the New York Times. She is the author of Sites of Slavery: Citizenship and Racial Democracy in the Post-Civil Rights Imagination and is currently working on a book on the civil rights icon, Nina Simone... Read More →
avatar for Gayle Wald

Gayle Wald

Twitter | | Gayle Wald is chair of American studies at George Washington University. She is author of It's Been Beautiful: Soul! and Black Power Television (Duke UP, 2015), about the pioneering TV showcase of black arts culture and politics. Shout, Sister, Shout!, a musical theater adaptation of her 2007 biography of Rosetta Tharpe, directed and produced by Randy Johnson with book by Cheryl L. West, opens in spring 2017 at Pasadena Playhouse. Gayle is a co-editor of Bloomsbury's 33 1/3 series... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 9:00am - 11:00am
JBL Theater MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

9:00am

Paranoid
“Look out, kid, they keep it all hid,” Bob Dylan said in 1965, and it was as true then as it is now. The clashes between old and new, between switched-on and turned-off, between freedom and unfreedom that defined the 1960s bred hostility, secrecy, and the nagging sense that They or Them or The Others or Those People were all engaged in shadowy plots and nefarious subterfuges that were tucked away just out of sight. And, in a way, they were. In this panel, we’ll explore stories of paranoia, conspiracy, and the conviction that no matter what side you’re on, the phone’s tapped anyway.

Jesse Jarnow, “A Survey of Pop Conspiracy Folktales”
Timothy Murphy, “Guerra all’omertà: Popular Music and Paranoia in Seventies Italy”
Malcolm Boyle, “‘I Saw Couples Injecting Reefers’—or Why The UFO Club Was Closed Down”
Andy Zax, “Talkin’ John Birch Paranoid Blues: The Unpopular Pop of Right-Wing Conspiracists”

Moderators
avatar for Mairead Case

Mairead Case

Twitter | | Mairead Case is a working writer, and a PhD candidate at the University of Denver, Summer Writing Program Coordinator at Naropa, and a teacher at these places and the Denver women’s jail. She wrote the novel See You In the Morning (featherproof) and Tenderness (Meekling), a poetry chapbook. An intersectional feminist, Mairead has been a legal observer with the NLG for over a decade, and writes and publishes widely on music, narrative, and politics... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Malcolm Boyle

Malcolm Boyle

Malcolm Boyle is a producer-director, writer, and performer. His credits include Avalon—A Field in Glastonbury, Ali G Before He Was Massif, Ideal, and Nebulous. He is currently making the feature documentary Hoppy—Underground Head, which was featured by the Victoria and Albert Museum as the climax of the launch event for their current exhibition on underground culture... Read More →
JJ

Jesse Jarnow

Twitter | | Jesse Jarnow (@bourgwick) is the author of Heads: A Biography of Psychedelic America (Da Capo, 2016) and Big Day Coming: Yo La Tengo & the Rise of Indie Rock (Gotham, 2012). Since 2008, he has hosted the Frow Show on WFMU in Jersey City. | | “A Survey of Pop Conspiracy... Read More →
avatar for Timothy Murphy

Timothy Murphy

Timothy S. Murphy is Houston-Truax-Wentz Professor and Regents Professor of English at Oklahoma State University. He is the author of Wising Up the Marks: The Amodern William Burroughs (1997) and Antonio Negri: Modernity and the Multitude (2012), as well as many articles on modern and contemporary literature and culture. He has translated many texts from French and Italian, and he edited the scholarly journal Genre: Forms of Discourse and Culture from 2000 to 2013... Read More →
AZ

Andy Zax

Twitter | | Andy Zax (@andyzax) is a Grammy-nominated music producer. His writing—under his own name and the pseudonym @Discographies—has appeared in Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, The Oxford American, and elsewhere. The Village Voice hailed him as its music critic of the year in 2010, and he received an ASCAP Deems Taylor Award in 2014. He lives in Los Angeles, where he is at work on a book about Beverly Hills in the 1980s... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 9:00am - 11:00am
Learning Labs MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

9:00am

State Politics: US, Australia and UK
Taking its title from a policy document, in which UK Music spelled out how government policy might be used to “liberate creativity,” this panel brings together practitioners and academics to reflect upon the role of the local and national state on music. The panel focuses on the ways in which the state encourages or limits music creativity, and the range of external governmentalities at work. The speakers examine different sectors and activities within the music industries, including copyright, tourism, music cities, live venues, and ticketing empires.

Kate Becker, “Seattle, City of Music”
Shane Homan, “‘Lockout’ Laws or ‘Rock Out’ Laws? Live Music and the Night-Time Economy”
John Street, “Musical States: How Governments Make Music, and Music Makes Governments”
Martin Cloonan, “Just The Ticket? Touting, Policy, and Neo Liberalism”

Moderators
avatar for David Suisman

David Suisman

Twitter | | David Suisman is associate professor of history at the University of Delaware. He is the author of Selling Sounds: The Commercial Revolution in American Music, winner of numerous awards, and co-editor of Sound in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. His articles have appeared in the Journal of American History, Social Text, Radical History Review, The Believer, and other publications. He is also associate editor of the Journal of Popular Music Studies and a sometime disc jockey at freeform radio station WFMU... Read More →

Speakers
KB

Kate Becker

Twitter | | Kate Becker, Director of the Seattle Office of Film + Music, works to execute Mayor Murray’s and the Music Commission’s vision for a vibrant, innovative, and equitable creative economy. She co-founded Seattle’s Vera Project and founded the Old Fire House in Redmond, WA, legendary all ages venues that have helped build... Read More →
avatar for Martin Cloonan

Martin Cloonan

Twitter | | Martin Cloonan is Professor of Popular Music Politics at the University of Glasgow. His research interests span the political economy of the music industries with particular interests in live music, music policy, and issues of freedom of expression. His most recent book (with John Williamson) is Player's Work Time: A history of the British Musicians' Union. Martin is coordinating editor for Popular Music... Read More →
avatar for Shane Homan

Shane Homan

Shane Homan is Associate Professor of media and cultural studies at Monash University, Melbourne. Shane is currently involved in two Australian Research Council projects: Interrogating the Music City: pop and the cultural economy of Melbourne; and The economic and cultural value of music exports. His most recent book (with Martin Cloonan and Jen Cattermole) is Popular Music Industries and the State: Policy Notes (Routledge... Read More →
avatar for John Street

John Street

John Street is a professor of politics at the University of East Anglia, UK. He has written extensively about the relationship between music and politics, most recently in the book Music and Politics (Polity, 2012). He is also a contributor to the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Protest Music and a member of the editorial group of the journal Popular... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 9:00am - 11:00am
Demo Lab MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

11:15am

Artistic Freedom

RJ Smith, “Junie: The America Dayton Made”
Jalylah Burrell, “Spurning the Soul Silo: Millie Jackson’s Freedom Songbook”
Annie Zaleski, “November Spawned a Monster: Why Morrissey's Tangible Acknowledgment of Disability Culture Remains so Radical”
Ann Powers, “Lament for the Death of My Cock: Jim Morrison as Phallic Disruptor”


Moderators
avatar for Evelyn McDonnell

Evelyn McDonnell

Twitter | | Evelyn McDonnell has written or coedited six books, from Rock She Wrote: Women Write about Rock, Pop and Rap to Queens of Noise: The Real Story of the Runaways. A longtime journalist, she has been a pop culture writer at The Miami Herald and a senior editor at The Village Voice. Her writing has appeared in publications including the Los Angeles Times, Ms., Rolling Stone, The New York Times, Spin, Travel... Read More →

Speakers
JB

Jalylah Burrell

Twitter | | Jalylah Burrell is a writer, oral historian, educator, and DJ reared in Seattle and based in Harlem. A scholar of Black popular culture, her research interests include African American literature and history; African diasporic aesthetic and critical practices; popular music; comedy; and film and television history. A PhD candidate in Yale University's departments of American Studies and African American Studies, she is currently completing the manuscript, Capacity for Laughter: Toward a Black Feminist Theory of Humor... Read More →
avatar for Ann Powers

Ann Powers

Twitter | | Ann Powers is a critic and correspondent for NPR Music. She has worked for many publications including the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, the Village Voice, and SPIN. She was a founding editor of the SF Weekly and, in the early 2000s, worked as a curator at S... Read More →
avatar for RJ Smith

RJ Smith

RJ Smith is the author of The One: The Life and Music of James Brown, and is currently working on a biography of photographer/filmmaker Robert Frank, to be published this year by Da Capo. He has previously presented papers at Pop Conference on John Cage, Johnny Otis, and the music that grew out of Los... Read More →
avatar for Annie Zaleski

Annie Zaleski

Twitter | | Annie Zaleski is a freelance journalist, editor and critic based in Cleveland, Ohio. Previously, she was on staff as an editor at the Riverfront Times and Alternative Press; currently, she’s a contributing writer at The A.V. Club and a columnist at Salon. Her profiles, interviews and criticism have appeared in publications such as Rolling Stone, Spin, Vulture, Billboard, the Village Voice, Cleveland Plain Dealer, and Las Vegas... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 11:15am - 1:15pm
JBL Theater MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

11:15am

I Fought the Law
Rachel Miller, “‘Mere Mechanics of the Orchestra’: The Politics of Art and Labor in the Nineteenth-Century Creative Economy”
Darin DeWitt, “‘Can I Get a Witness?’ How Musician Testimony Challenges the Capitol’s Conventions”
Stan Soocher, “Legal Challenges To Governmental Ordinances”
Jarryn Ha, “What’s in a Hit?: South Korean Government’s War on Marijuana, Decadence, and Foreign Musical Influences”

Moderators
KM

Katherine Meizel

Katherine Meizel is Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology at Bowling Green State University. She earned her doctorates in ethnomusicology and vocal performance at UCSB. Her book Idolized: Music, Media, and Identity in American Idol was published in 2011; she also wrote about Idol for Slate from 2007-2011. For Oxford University Press, she is currently co-editing a Handbook of Voice Studies, and completing her monograph Multivocality: An Ethnography of Singing on the Borders of Identity... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Darin DeWitt

Darin DeWitt

Darin DeWitt holds a PhD in Political Science from UCLA. He is Assistant Professor of Political Science at California State University, Long Beach where he studies American politics, Congress, and public opinion. His work has been published in Celebrity Studies, PS: Political Science... Read More →
avatar for Jarryn Ha

Jarryn Ha

Jarryn Ha is a PhD candidate in Historical Musicology at Case Western Reserve University. A native of Seoul, Korea, he has been active in research of the nation’s popular music and culture through the lens of cultural history, genders, technologies, and religions. | | “What’s in a Hit?: South Korean... Read More →
avatar for Rachel Miller

Rachel Miller

Rachel Miller is a PhD candidate in American Culture at the University of Michigan, where she is writing a dissertation titled “Capital Entertainment: Creative Labor and the Modern Stage, 1840–1910.” Her work has been published in scholarly journals and edited collections as well as in the Los Angeles Review of Books and... Read More →
avatar for Stan Soocher

Stan Soocher

Entertainment attorney Stan Soocher is Associate Professor of Music & Entertainment Industry Studies at the University of Colorado Denver and Editor-in-Chief of the monthly Entertainment Law & Finance. His books include Baby You’re a Rich Man: Suing the Beatles for Fun & Profit and They Fought the Law: Rock Music Goes to Court. He... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 11:15am - 1:15pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

11:15am

Politics of Sex and Consent
Lucy O’Brien, “Destroy the Spectacle: Alison Goldfrapp and Murder in the English Countryside”
Rebecca Sheehan, “‘Little 15’: Pop Music and the Politics of Consent That May Impact Political Messages in Music”
Tyina Steptoe, “Sex, Race, and Early Rock ‘n’ Roll”

Moderators
avatar for Maria Elena Buszek 

Maria Elena Buszek 

Maria Elena Buszek is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Colorado Denver. Her recent publications include the books Pin-Up Grrrls: Feminism, Sexuality, Popular Culture and Extra/Ordinary: Craft and Contemporary Art, and contributions to the anthology Punkademics: The Basement Show in the Ivory Tower and exhibition catalog Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia. Her current book project explores the history of art/music hybrids since 1977. | | Roundtable: What is Politics? | Music and politics. These are both highly contested terms, difficult to define despite the fact that we use them constantly. To place them in relation to each other is to destabilize them even more, and to intensify the issues they raise. This panel interrogates the common-sense understandings of these keywords to locate the politics that inhabit hidden spaces, affective exchanges, aesthetics, postures, and embodiments. Beyond the notion that musical politics are something we know when we see... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jane Kozey

Jane Kozey

Jane Kozey is a doctoral student in ethnomusicology at NYU, holding a Bachelor of Arts in Russian and East European Studies from Yale University (2014). Jane's current project focuses on popular music's role in LGBT self-representation in Russia. Other interests include sound studies, critical race theory, and the role of discipline and listening in U.S. public schools... Read More →
avatar for Lucy O’Brien

Lucy O’Brien

Twitter | | Writer/broadcaster Lucy O’Brien has published She Bop: The Definitive History of Women in Popular Music (2013), plus in-depth biographies Madonna: Like An Icon (2007) and Dusty (2000). She played in all-girl punk band The Catholic Girls, and has contributed to a range of titles including the Guardian, Sunday Times, Q, and MOJO. She is currently Course Leader for the BA Music Journalism and BA Music Marketing... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Sheehan

Rebecca Sheehan

Twitter | | Rebecca Sheehan is the director of the Gender Studies program and a lecturer in Sociology at Macquarie University, and a visiting fellow at the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. She is working on a monograph entitled Rise of the Superwoman: How Sex Remade Gender in... Read More →
avatar for Tyina Steptoe

Tyina Steptoe

Twitter | | Tyina Steptoe is a historian who writes and teaches about race, gender, and culture in the twentieth-century United States. Her book, Houston Bound: Culture and Color in a Jim Crow City, was published by the University of California Press in 2015. She is currently working on a book manuscript that explores race, sexuality, and rhythm and blues music. She works at the University of Arizona in Tucson... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 11:15am - 1:15pm
Learning Labs MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

11:15am

Staging Race
Lucy Caplan, “‘Aida Going Dixie’: Race, Casting, and Collaborative Protest”
Michael Millner, “Black Sounds in the Silver Factory”
Jerome Dotson, “‘Elijah’s Got a Plan’: The Nation of Islam, Protest and 80s and 90s Hip-Hop”
Diana Buendia, “Against a Generalizing Universal: How the Music of Nicolas Jaar, Helado Negro, and Elysia Crampton Warp the ‘Latin Music’ Label”
 

Moderators
TN

Tavia Nyong’o

Tavia Nyong’o is Professor of African-American, American Studies and Theatre Studies at Yale University. His first book, The Amalgamation Waltz: Race, Performance, and the Ruses of Memory (Minnesota, 2009), won the Errol Hill Award for best book in African American theatre and performance studies. He is completing a study of fabulation in contemporary black art and performance, and is the author or numerous articles on performance, politics and music... Read More →

Speakers
DB

Diana Buendía

Diana Buendía is from Guayaquil, Ecuador. She moved to the U.S. to get her undergraduate degree in American Studies from the University of Texas at Austin and a graduate degree in Arts Journalism from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She lives in Los Angeles and works in film. Through her work she studies the hegemonic tensions between the U.S. and Latin America and the way related narratives refract back through media... Read More →
LC

Lucy Caplan

Twitter | | Lucy Caplan is a PhD candidate in American Studies and African American Studies at Yale. Her dissertation focuses on opera and blackness during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. While at Yale, Lucy also earned a master’s concentration in Public Humanities, and she has held internships and fellowships at Boston Lyric Opera, the Beinecke Library, the West End Museum, and the Cambridge Historical Society. She is the recipient of the 2016 Rubin Prize for Music Criticism... Read More →
JD

Jerome Dotson

Jerome Dotson is an assistant professor in the Africana Studies program at the University of Arizona. He earned his PhD in U.S. History from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Currently, he is working on a book manuscript, which examines race, diet, and body politics in the African diaspora... Read More →
avatar for Michael Millner

Michael Millner

Twitter | | Michael Millner frequently works at the intersection of popular culture and political theory in the 19th and 20th centuries. His short essays and reviews have appeared in The Brooklyn Rail, First of the Month, and other arts and culture outlets. His longer academic essays can be found in Arizona Quarterly, American Quarterly, ESQ, and other journals... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 11:15am - 1:15pm
Demo Lab MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:00pm

Government Agency
Sheryl Kaskowitz, “‘Cooperation is Our Aim’: The Covert Music Unit of the Resettlement Administration, 1935–1937”
Alfred Soto, “Mourning in America: How Ronald Reagan Smiled on a Low and Dishonest Decade”
Jeff Treviño, “On Top of the Running Man is the Flying Man: Technology and the Mass Performance of Neighbor Envy in Kim Jong-un's Moranbong Band”

Moderators
avatar for Greil Marcus

Greil Marcus

Twitter | | Greil Marcus is the author, most recently, of Real Life Rock: The Complete Top 10 Columns, 1986-2014 and Three Songs, Three Singers, Three Nations, both from 2015. With Werner Sollors he edited A New Literary History of America (2009). In recent years he has taught at Berkeley, CUNY Graduate Center, and the New School. He lives in Oakland. (Photo Credit: Ida... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sheryl Kaskowitz

Sheryl Kaskowitz

Twitter | | Sheryl Kaskowitz is a writer and independent scholar based in Providence, Rhode Island. She was a 2016 Kluge Fellow at the Library of Congress, and in 2014 her book, God Bless America: The Surprising History of an Iconic Song, received an ASCAP/Deems Taylor Award for excellence in music writing. Sheryl holds a PhD in music with an ethnomusicology focus from Harvard and a B.A. from Oberlin College. (Photo Credit: Tobia Imbier... Read More →
avatar for Alfred Soto

Alfred Soto

Twitter | | Alfred Soto is an instructor of journalism and media advisor at Florida International University. He is a contributing editor to The Singles Jukebox and was featured editor of Stylus Magazine. His work has appeared in SPIN, The Miami Herald, Rolling Stone, Slate, MTV, NPR, and The Pitchfork Review. He lives in... Read More →
avatar for Jeff Treviño

Jeff Treviño

Twitter | | Jeff Treviño's work interrogates the way that innovative uses of technology reinvent composing, performing, and listening. He has created a robotically augmented concert tuba, dubbed the SCUBA (Self-contained Unified Bass Augmenter); contributes to a Python API that enables composers to generate fully formatted musical scores via object-oriented programming; and composes works in a variety of acoustic, electroacoustic, and multimedia genres. He is currently Assistant Professor of Recording and Music Technology at California State University, Monterey Bay... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:00pm

Performance of Diaspora
Taking up questions of agency in popular music, this panel seeks to address the noisy, sonic, and embodied politics of diaspora. Ranging in scale from creative choices a raced artist to connected performances across an ocean, these panelists examine how the histories of particular popular music genres open up a space for performers of color to express dissenting voices and perspectives. The papers of this panel tread in alternative, punk, and bomba—three genres that are themselves racialized—to ask about the political labor of performing, racialized bodies. To that end, these papers collectively ask: How the travels of people, musical forms, and power are taken up in the diaspora? Douglas S. Ishii examines the sounds of nostalgia in rock guitarist James Iha’s country-inflected solo albums to interrogate how Iha negotiated his Asian American visibility in the U.S. multiculturalist zeitgeist amidst the racialization of popular music genres. Thea Quiray Tagle analyzes how Filipino and Filipino American punk and metal bands took up “punk’s sense of outsider subjectivity” as a form of protest during two oppressive presidencies in the Philippines: Ferdinand Marcos and Rodrigo Duterte. Jade Power Sotomayor interrogates the relationship of embodied music-making and dance in the use of bomba in political actions around Puerto Rico and the territory’s diaspora. Together, this panel uses popular music, a form often dismissed as trivial, as a way of probing the larger histories, energies, and imaginaries of power in which musicians intervene.

Douglas S. Ishii, “Let It Come Down: James Iha and the Racialization of Multiculturalism”
Thea Quiray Tagle, “Punk in a Time of Genocide: Filipino/American Sonic Resistance to Marcos and Duterte”
Jade Power Sotomayor, “Dancing the Music of Protest: Embodied Sovereignties and Puerto Rican Bomba"

Moderators
JH

Jack Halberstam

Twitter | | Jack Halberstam is a professor of English and Gender Studies at Columbia University. Having just moved from LA to NY, from West to East, Jack is learning to live with the cold again and enjoying the sights and sounds of Brooklyn while writing two new books—one titled Trans* looks at new forms of gendered embodiment and the other titled Wild Things explores the chaotic, the untamed and the anarchic for alternative models of living, thinking and desiring... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Douglas S. Ishii

Douglas S. Ishii

Douglas S. Ishii is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Asian American Humanities at Northwestern University. He was a Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Colorado, Boulder. His manuscript-in-progress, Dissembling Diversities: Asian Pacific American Arts Activism and the Racialization of Sophistication, examines Asian American activist media through their dual influences of grassroots social movement organizing and the liberal class politics of... Read More →
avatar for Jade Power Sotomayor

Jade Power Sotomayor

Jade Power Sotomayor is an Assistant Professor in Interdisciplinary Arts at the University of Washington, Bothell. Her book project ¡Habla!: Speaking Bodies in Latinx Dance and Performance examines what she calls the “speaking body” in various sites of performance (solo-performance, Puerto... Read More →
TQ

Thea Quiray Tagle

Thea Quiray Tagle is a scholar and teacher of Interdisciplinary Arts and American and Ethnic Studies at the University of Washington Bothell. She is currently working on her manuscript, Salvaging Community: Socially Engaged Art, Urban Renewal, and the Remaking of San Francisco, which examines visual art and performance responding to the rampant gentrification of the San Francisco Bay Area... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Demo Lab MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:00pm

The All-Star Charity Single, Reconsidered
This roundtable will consider the politics—and, yes, the art—of this often-derided and under-theorized musical staple. Possible issues of discussion include the place of charity singles in the wider history of protest song and pop music activism; the relationship of the charity singles to gospel, Adult Contemporary, and other traditions; questions of nationalism, colonialism, and a pop musical “white man’s burden”; and the shifting role of benefit records in the era of Internet and social media activism.

Panel participants promise to check their egos at the door—but not their ids.

Short presentations on particular charity singles will be followed by general discussion and Q&A.

Moderators
avatar for Jody Rosen

Jody Rosen

Twitter | | Jody Rosen is writer at The New York Times Magazine. He was previously critic-at-large for T: The New York Times Style Magazine, the music critic for New York, Slate, and The Nation, and a senior critic at Rolling Stone. His new book, Two Wheels Good: A Bicycle History of the World, will be published by Crown in 2018... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jason King

Jason King

Twitter | | Jason King, PhD is Associate Professor, Director of Global Studies, and Director of Writing, History & Emergent Media Studies and the founding faculty member at New York University's Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music. A journalist, musician, DJ, and producer, he was the program's first Interim Chair, Associate Chair and Artistic Director. Jason has been teaching classes on popular music history, the music business (marketing/branding), and the social aspects of music technology for many years, as well as teaching at NYU campuses in Singapore and Abu Dhabi and developing study abroad programs in Berlin and Havana. He is the author of The Michael Jackson Treasures, a 2009 Barnes and Noble exclusive biography on the King of Pop, which has been translated in more than seven languages, and a regular contributor to publications like Pitchfork, Billboard, Buzzfeed, Slate, and Vice. He has been an expert witness in copyright infringement cases for Jay Z, Timbaland, Lady Gaga, Madonna, and others, and he has appeared in many music documentaries, including Spike Lee's critically acclaimed Bad 25 and Michael... Read More →
avatar for Karen Tongson

Karen Tongson

Twitter | | Karen Tongson is Associate Professor of English and Gender Studies at University of Southern California, and the author of Relocations: Queer Suburban Imaginaries (NYU Press). Her work has appeared in numerous venues in print and online. She has a forthcoming book with ForEdge Press... Read More →
avatar for Carl Wilson

Carl Wilson

Twitter | | Carl Wilson is the author of Let’s Talk About Love: Why Other People Have Such Bad Taste, which was recently listed by Billboard as one of the “100 Best All-Time Music Books.” He is Slate’s music critic and a past or present contributor to The New York Times, Spin, The Globe and Mail, Bookforum, Billboard, and many other publications. He lives in Toronto. | | Roundtable: The All-Star Charity Single, Reconsidered... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
JBL Theater MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:00pm

Trap Rap’s Crossover Into Mainstream Pop
Trap music started as a subgenre of Atlanta hip-hop that gained popularity in the early 2000s. Although rappers like Backbone and OutKast of the Dungeon Family rapped about the dangers of getting caught up in the dramatics and consequences of the trap as a form of drug culture, it wasn’t until rapper T.I. and his second album Trap Muzik that the trap was branded with a life and sound of its own. The southern hip-hop interpretation of the trap was a lyrically and sonically grimy space, consisting of stark bass lines, synthesizers, and low-pitched vocals. Trap rappers amplified if not celebrated the trap’s gritty reality as a reflection of the post-Civil Rights Black South, a far cry from the previous generation of Atlanta rappers’ rendering of the trap as a warning. This is significant, considering how Trap music served as an oppositional statement to Atlanta’s burgeoning position as an international hub. There are now generations of trap rappers, including ‘first generation’ artists like T.I.P., Young Jeezy, Yo Gotti, and Gucci Mane to newer Trap rappers like Pill, Future, Migos, and Fetty Wap.

Our roundtable panel is interested in how Trap Music has crossed over from its southern hip-hop roots into other areas of popular culture like EDM and Pop Music. From fleeting references to the Trap a la Nicki Minaj’s “Beez in the Trap” or giving street cred to pop artists i.e. Katy Perry for “Dark Horse,” the Trap has become mobile and decentered from its original intentions. What are the requirements to define a piece of music or culture as ‘trap?’ How does region and musical preference influence how one listens to and defines trap music? Ultimately, our panel seeks to trace Trap’s transition from a musical and cultural statement of southern hip-hop into its current state as a frivolous accessory/moment in popular music and culture.

Moderators
avatar for Regina N. Bradley

Regina N. Bradley

Twitter | | Regina N. Bradley is Assistant Professor of African American Literature at Armstrong State University in Savannah, GA. She writes about race and sound, hip-hop, and the post-Civil Rights Black American South. Her first book, Chronicling Stankonia: OutKast and the Rise of the Hip-hop South, is forthcoming from University of North Carolina Press. She can be reached at redclayscholar.com or via Twitter @redclayscholar. | | Roundtable: Trap... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Fredara Mareva Hadley

Fredara Mareva Hadley

Fredara Mareva Hadley is a Visiting Assistant Professor in Ethnomusicology at Oberlin College specializing in African American music and popular music. Hadley has presented work at numerous major conferences and been published in the Encyclopedia of African American Music, Okayplayer, and Urb magazine. In addition to her research, Hadley founded Jooksi, a company that provides music education classes for the public, and music-based walking tours of New York City. | | Roundtable: Trap... Read More →
avatar for Jack Hamilton

Jack Hamilton

Twitter | | Jack Hamilton teaches in the departments of American Studies and Media Studies at the University of Virginia and is the author of Just around Midnight: Rock and Roll and the Racial Imagination (Harvard University Press, 2016). He is also the pop critic for Slate magazine, where he writes about music, sports, and other areas of culture. He is currently working on a cultural history of inhuman musical instruments since 1970... Read More →
MP

Marco Pavé

Twitter | | Marco Pavé is Project Pat meets KRS-ONE. Spitting an urban country consciousness with a confidence that could only emerge from coming of age as a Muslim Milllennial in North Memphis. As a rapper and songwriter, Marco Pavé appeals to a diversity of rap enthusiasts, from purists to radio lovers to hipsters, with a soulful style of hip-hop storytelling and community engagement that appeals to racial and geographically diverse millennial audiences... Read More →
avatar for Zandria F. Robinson

Zandria F. Robinson

Zandria F. Robinson writes on Southern hip-hop, the urban South, and Black feminist themes in the work of Black women popular culture artists. Her book, This Ain’t Chicago: Race, Class, and Regional Identity in the Post-Soul South is an ethnographic and pop examination of the intersections of race, class, gender, and region in Black identity. Robinson teaches sociology at Rhodes College, blogs at... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Learning Labs MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

3:45pm

Black Politics in the Reagan Era
In our current political condition, many of us are looking back to the Reagan era, remembering the climate of dissent and rage that made our pleasures political. Presenters on this panel look back at a range of black musical genres and artists, from Prince to punk rock to house, asking just how their work articulated the “sign o’ the times,” and what it meant to “party like it’s 1999” as people died and wars were waged. The papers explore the structures of collectivity in the ways these musics were formed, as well as the kinds of communality these musics and artists galvanized.

Jayna Brown, “’These are Coptic Times,’ Thrashing to the Bad Brains, 1983”
Tavia Nyong’o, “Strange Relationship: Prince and the Political”
DJ Lynée Denise, “Fatal Pleasure: House Music, Disappearing Bodies, and Dance Floor Ghosts”

Moderators
avatar for Salamishah Tillet

Salamishah Tillet

Twitter | | Salamishah Tillet is an associate professor of English and Africana Studies and a faculty member of the Alice Paul Center for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality at the University of Pennsylvania. She has appeared on the BBC, CNN, MSNBC, NPR, and PBS, and in Ebony and Essence, published articles with The Atlantic.com, Elle, The Chicago Tribune, The Guardian, The Nation, The Root, Time.com, and regularly contributes to the New York Times. She is the author of Sites of Slavery: Citizenship and Racial Democracy in the Post-Civil Rights Imagination and is currently working on a book on the civil rights icon, Nina Simone... Read More →

Speakers
JB

Jayna Brown

Twitter | | Jayna Brown is Associate Professor of English and Ethnic Studies at UC Riverside. Her first book, Babylon Girls: Black Women Performers and the Shaping of the Modern was published by Duke University Press in 2008. Her new book Black Utopias: Speculative Life and the Music of Other Worlds (under peer review at Duke University Press) traces black radical utopian practice and vision, from the psychic travels of Sojourner Truth to Sun... Read More →
avatar for DJ Lynée Denise

DJ Lynée Denise

DJ Lynnée Denise works as an artist who incorporates self-directed, project-based research into interactive workshops, music events, and performative lectures. She coined the term “DJ Scholarship” to explain DJ culture as a mix-mode research practice, both performative and subversive in its ability to shape and define social experiences, shifting the public perception of the role of a DJ from being purveyor of party music to an archivist, cultural worker, and information specialist who assesses, collects, organizes, preserves, and provides access to music determined to have long term value. Denise is currently a Visiting Artist at California State... Read More →
TN

Tavia Nyong’o

Tavia Nyong’o is Professor of African-American, American Studies and Theatre Studies at Yale University. His first book, The Amalgamation Waltz: Race, Performance, and the Ruses of Memory (Minnesota, 2009), won the Errol Hill Award for best book in African American theatre and performance studies. He is completing a study of fabulation in contemporary black art and performance, and is the author or numerous articles on performance, politics and music... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Learning Labs MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

3:45pm

Listening
Sarah Messabauer, “‘They Might Feel Different’: The Lingering Political Legacy of Billy Joel’s ‘Allentown’”
Glenn McDonald, “Speaks Truth to Power Metal: Conceptual Fantasy, Cryptic Nihilism and the Abstruse Political Neutrality of Progressive Rock and Metal”
Whitney Jones, “I Disapprove of What You're Singing About, but I Will Defend My Right to Enjoy It Anyway: The Politics of Listening to Musicians Whose Politics You Find Objectionable”

Moderators
HG

Holly Gleason

Holly Gleason is a music critic, artist development consultant and adjunct professor of Music Criticism at Middle Tennessee State. A 2016 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame/Case Western Reserve Studies of Pop Music Fellow, she is the editor of Woman Walk The Line: Women Writers on the Coun... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Whitney Jones

Whitney Jones

Twitter | | Whitney Jones has been a public radio/podcast producer for the past five years. He has appeared on NPR, CBC, and a number of local/regional stations, as well as on popular podcasts like 99% Invisible. Jones has reported on everything from politics to sports to arts and has been hosting and producing his music journalism show Pitch since 2013. Pitch just recently became an Audible Originals program... Read More →
GM

Glenn McDonald

Twitter | | Glenn McDonald believes that music is the thing that humans do best, and that apparent escapism is always essentially a secret oblique strategy for engagement in wonder. At Spotify he channels this into genre categorization, music discovery, personalization, trend detection, augmented nostalgia, and exponentiated joy. He spoke about Every Noise at Once at Pop Con 2014, Satanic metal in 2015, and the authorial voice of algorithms in 2016... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Messbauer

Sarah Messbauer

Twitter | | A native of Allentown, Pennsylvania, Sarah Messbauer is a PhD student in ethnomusicology at the University of California, Davis. Her current research interests include the intersection of public policy and migrant community arts projects as demonstrated in her forthcoming dissertation on Haitian music festivals in eastern Canada. In future work, Sarah hopes to shift her focus toward the impact of public arts policies on the development of refugee communities in Canada and the United States... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

3:45pm

Radio
“So you had better do what you are told / You better listen to the radio.” In 1978, Elvis Costello delivered his sardonic takedown of what he perceived as the tyranny of commercial radio. “I want to bite the hand that feeds me,” Costello told us, mocking radio as “a sound salvation” for its role in “cleaning up the nation.” Firing back at Costello’s easy critique, this panel examines the political potentials of radio by considering the ways this musical medium has balanced state power, commercial enterprise, and the expressions of liberatory and hegemonic politics. Through historical and literary analysis, we offer a nuanced view of radio as a site of political formation that is neither inherently oppressive nor totally subversive but always shaped by the tension between these positions. Historians and cultural studies scholars like Lizabeth Cohen, George Lipsitz, and Susan J. Douglas have emphasized radio’s liberatory potentials. They celebrated the ways radio created a pop culture lingua franca for immigrant workers in the 1930s, as well as adolescents in the 1950s and 1960s, through which these listeners articulated progressive visions of their futures. We argue that the government’s role in the curation of radio content and its intersection with artistic expression requires more attention. Our panel takes up the interest in radio, politics, identity, and genre proposed in recent works by Kim J. Simpson and Eric Weisbard with a focus on the variety of political messages conveyed through the airwaves. By examining the relationship between state-sanctioned radio messaging, the pop music chosen to communicate these messages, and the racial, gender, ethnic, and regional identities of targeted listening publics, this panel seeks to interrogate “reasonable” radio, pop radio that reasons with its listeners. Using music from the VD Radio Project’s public service announcements, The Major Bowes Original Amateur Hour, and the United States Air Force’s Country Music Time radio program, we analyze the ways folk, gospel, country, and pop came to define the meanings of citizenship and national belonging at different historical moments over the twentieth century.

Sophie Abramowitz, “‘Run Him Right Out of the Country’: The 1949 V.D. Radio Project”
Karl Hagstrom Miller, “Amateur Dreams and Radio Schemes in Hard Times”
Joey Thompson, “‘Brought to You By Your United States Air Force’: How Country Radio and Military Recruitment Joined Forces in the 1960s”

Moderators
avatar for Diane Pecknold

Diane Pecknold

Diane Pecknold is an Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Louisville, where she teaches girls’ studies, gender and popular music, and feminist history. She has published extensively on the racial and gender dynamics of country music and is currently working with Sarah Dougher on a book about tween... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sophie Abramowitz

Sophie Abramowitz

Twitter | | Sophie Abramowitz is a doctoral candidate in the English department of the University of Virginia, specializing in American literature, music, and culture. Her dissertation focuses on popular and folk song collection, production, and reception in the Harlem Renaissance. An erstwhile oral historian and former archival assistant for the Alan Lomax Archive, she is currently working with Americana Music Productions on Mabel... Read More →
KH

Karl Hagstrom Miller

Karl Hagstrom Miller teaches courses in popular music at the University of Virginia. He is the author of Segregating Sound: Inventing Folk and Pop Music in the Age of Jim Crow. He is currently writing a history of pop music in the United States from the perspective of amateur musicians. And he is a co-founder of the Prince Rogers Nelson Memorial Music Appreciation Society... Read More →
avatar for Joey Thompson

Joey Thompson

Twitter | | Joseph M. Thompson is a doctoral candidate in the University of Virginia’s Corcoran Department of History. His dissertation, “Sounding Southern: Music, Militarism, and the Making of the Sunbelt,” uses popular music to examine the cultural impact of the military-industrial complex on racial, political, and regional identities since the 1950s... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Demo Lab MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

3:45pm

Remembering Juan Gabriel
Among the many notable and disheartening deaths of 2016 was Mexican pop icon Juan Gabriel. American media compared Juan Gabriel to Elton John, Liberace, and Prince among others for his virtuosity and queerness, however, this only begins to do justice to his legacy. Considered one of Mexico’s greatest performers and cultural icons, Juan Gabriel’s career spanned over four decades and included innumerable hits and accolades. Like many great artists Juan Gabriel reinvented himself continuously through various genres of Mexican popular music. From mariachi, to pop, to disco, to American classic rock covers, Juan Gabriel’s range was legendary. His popularity cut across deep divisions in Mexico, the Mexican diaspora and other Latin American countries—he is at once a queer icon, a Mexican national icon, and an international superstar. Juan Gabriel’s flamboyant dress and performances defied masculine gender norms and his sexuality was an open secret. His songs can be heard at birthday parties, quinceañeras, funerals, and anywhere mariachis gather. For Mexican immigrants in the U.S. Juan Gabriel represented a sonic connection to the Mexico they left behind and imagined still existed. His rags to riches life story also connected with their aspirations and struggles. Juan Gabriel was among the first Mexican artists to routinely tour and sell out large arenas in U.S. cities, paving the way for the Mexican regional music industry in the U.S. and other genres and performers.

This roundtable considers the legacy or lasting impact of Juan Gabriel’s musical career. Themes to be addressed include: Juan Gabriel’s performance aesthetic, the diversity of his audience, transnational musical migrations, and music industry impact.

Moderators
avatar for José G. Anguiano

José G. Anguiano

José G. Anguiano is an Assistant Professor in the Honors College and the Department of Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies at California State University, Los Angeles. Dr. Anguiano is a cultural studies scholar with a primary focus in listeners and audiences of popular music. Dr... Read More →

Speakers
IC

Iris C. Avendaño

Iris C. Viveros Avendaño was born and raised in Mexico. She is a Ph.D. Candidate and a McNair Scholar at the University of Washington whose academic interests and research emphasize the integration of third world feminist approaches to analyze the impact of colonialism in present-day systems of violence... Read More →
AB

Anel Bautista Bravo

Anel Bautista Bravo received her BA from Cal State Los Angeles in Chicana/o Studies and is currently a Masters student at Cal State Northridge in the department of Chicana/o Studies. Her research interests include cultural production and identity, popular culture, decoloniality, and feminist theory within... Read More →
NF

Nicholas F. Centino

Nicholas F. Centino is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Chicana/o Studies at Loyola Marymount University. He earned his doctorate in Chicana and Chicano Studies from the University of California, Santa Barbara where he also received his undergraduate degree. His work examines the political economy of a historical moment through the lens of popular culture. From... Read More →
avatar for Jorge N. Leal

Jorge N. Leal

Twitter | | Jorge N. Leal is an urban and cultural historian whose research focuses on transnational Latina/o urban communities in Southern California. Previous to pursuing his doctoral training in History, Leal was an active participant in the Latina/o music scene in Los Angeles, both as rock critic for local publications and concert producer. Currently Leal is a PhD candidate in the History Department at UC San Diego where he is completing a dissertation that examines the generative articulations of participatory and cultural citizenship and the reshaping of the urban space in South East Los Angeles. | | Roundtable: Remembering Juan Gabriel | Among the many notable and disheartening deaths of 2016 was Mexican pop icon Juan Gabriel. American media compared Juan Gabriel to Elton John, Liberace, and Prince among others for his virtuosity and queerness, however, this only begins to do justice to his legacy. Considered one of... Read More →
FR

Fabian Romero

Purepécha poet-scholar Fabian Romero was born in Michoacán, Mexico and raised in the Pacific Northwest. They co-founded and participated in several writing and performance groups including Hijas de Su Madre, Las Mamalogues and Mixed Messages: Stories by People of Color. Their scholarship, poetry and experimental films are rooted in personal two spirit, queer and immigrant experiences. They are currently a Doctoral student in the Gender, Women... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 3:45pm - 5:15pm
JBL Theater MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

5:30pm

Diaspora Civics

Tinashe Mushakavanhu, "Bob Marley and the Making of Zimbabwe"
Banning Eyre, "The Children of Fela"
Antonia Randolph, “Truly Mine: Queering Intimacy and the Intimacy of Queerness within Hip-Hop Culture”


Moderators
avatar for Charles Mudede 

Charles Mudede 

Twitter | | Charles Mudede is a music, film, and cultural critic for The Stranger. He has also contributed to a number of national and international publications.

Speakers
BE

Banning Eyre

Twitter | | Banning Eyre is an author, guitarist, radio producer, journalist, photographer, and producer for the Peabody Award-winning public radio series Afropop Worldwide. His work has taken him to over 15 African countries to research local music, especially guitar styles. He comments on world music for... Read More →
TM

Tinashe Mushakavanhu

Twitter | | Tinashe Mushakavanhu is a writer and editor from Harare, Zimbabwe. He has degrees in Creative Writing and English Literature from English, Welsh, and Zimbabwean universities. He has also worked as a journalist and has held prestigious fellowships with global media companies such as CNN and VICE. He has co-edited four books. Bob Marley and the Making of Zimbabwe is his first major book... Read More →
avatar for Antonia Randolph

Antonia Randolph

Antonia Randolph is a lecturer in the Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology at Christopher Newport University, Virginia. Her interests include diversity discourse in education, non-normative black masculinity, and the production of misogyny in hip-hop culture. She has been published in Anthropology and Education Quarterly; Youth and Society; Race, Gender, and Class, and The Feminist Wire. Her current book project... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Demo Lab MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

5:30pm

Punk and Disorderly
Jenn Pelly, “(Anti-)Fascism Into Feminism”
Franz Nicolay, “‘Changing The Country, We Apologize For The Inconvenience’: DIY Punk as an Organizing Principle In The Post-Communist World”
Greil Marcus and Jon Langford, “On the Mekons”

Moderators
avatar for Damon Krukowski

Damon Krukowski

Twitter | | Damon Krukowski is a musician (Galaxie 500, Damon & Naomi) and writer. His first nonfiction book, The New Analog: Listening and Reconnecting in a Digital World will be published on Record Store Day 2017 by The New Press (New York). He is the recipient of a 2015 Creative Capital / Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant, and in 2016 he was a Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jon Langford

Jon Langford

Twitter | | Welsh-born Jon Langford, the original drummer for the punk band the Mekons, has released numerous recordings as a solo artist and with other bands, most notably the Waco Brothers, The Three Johns, and The Pine Valley Cosmonauts. Langford is also a respected visual artist and in 2015 was the artist in residence at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. Nashville Radio a book of... Read More →
avatar for Greil Marcus

Greil Marcus

Twitter | | Greil Marcus is the author, most recently, of Real Life Rock: The Complete Top 10 Columns, 1986-2014 and Three Songs, Three Singers, Three Nations, both from 2015. With Werner Sollors he edited A New Literary History of America (2009). In recent years he has taught at Berkeley, CUNY Graduate Center, and the New School. He lives in Oakland. (Photo Credit: Ida... Read More →
avatar for Franz Nicolay

Franz Nicolay

Twitter | | Franz Nicolay is a musician and writer with a discography ranging from punk to contemporary chamber music, including The Hold Steady and Against Me! He has been a contributor to several magazines, his first story collection Complicated Gardening Techniques was published in 2009, and his debut book, The Humorless Ladies of Border Control, appeared on The New Press in August 2016. He teaches at Bard College. (Photo Credit: Susan Lirakos... Read More →
JP

Jenn Pelly

Twitter | | Jenn Pelly is an associate editor at Pitchfork. Her writing has appeared in Spin, The Village Voice, Nylon, and Billboard and online at The New York Times and Rolling Stone. She is at work on her first book, a volume in the 33 1/3 series on The Raincoats' 1979 debut, to be published in 2017. A college radio enthusiast, she most recently hosted Crucial Chaos, the long-running hardcore show on WNYU 89.1 FM... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 5:30pm - 7:00pm
JBL Theater MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

5:30pm

War
John Williamson, “The Vanguard of the Revolution? British Musicians, Communism and State Espionage During the Second World War”
Danielle Stein, “The Office of Strategic Services Musac Project: ‘Lili Marleen,’ Marlene Dietrich, and the Weaponized Popular Music of WWII”
David Suisman, “The Militarization of the Ear: Music and War-Making from Ancient Greece to LollaFallujah”

Moderators
JC

Jaime Cardenas

Jaime Cardenas Jr. is Instructor of History with Tenure at Seattle Central College. His teaching and research have received grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Andrew Mellon Foundation, and other entities. He is a contributor to the keyword collection, Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments, published by the... Read More →

Speakers
DS

Danielle Stein

Danielle Stein is a PhD student in the musicology department at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her current research examines World War II propaganda music and the origins of weaponized music. Danielle is the honored recipient of the American Musicological Society’s Ingolf Dahl Memorial award in musicology. Also an avid community arts producer, Danielle is the assistant artistic director of the Celestial Opera Company and co-founder of the California Music Collective... Read More →
avatar for David Suisman

David Suisman

Twitter | | David Suisman is associate professor of history at the University of Delaware. He is the author of Selling Sounds: The Commercial Revolution in American Music, winner of numerous awards, and co-editor of Sound in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. His articles have appeared in the Journal of American History, Social Text, Radical History Review, The Believer, and other publications. He is also associate editor of the Journal of Popular Music Studies and a sometime disc jockey at freeform radio station WFMU... Read More →
avatar for John Williamson

John Williamson

Twitter | | John Williamson is an LKAS fellow in Popular Music Studies at the University of Glasgow. He recently co-authored Players’ Work Time: A History of the Musicians’ Union. Prior to this, he worked as a music journalist (for The Herald newspaper in Scotland) and as a manager of various Glasgow based bands, notably bis and Belle and Sebastian... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

5:30pm

Soul and the Voice of (Obama’s) America
What does it mean when the President sings? When he sings Al Green? When he sings “I’m…so in love with you,” (with who?) at the Apollo Theater, in Harlem, at a campaign fundraiser? When downloads of “Let’s Stay Together” then proceed to surge 500%?

What does it mean when “This American Life” asks Sarah Bareilles, who lists Sam Cooke and Etta James as vocal inspirations, to imagine what is going on inside the mind of that President as his second term comes to an end, and what does it mean when she writes a song for the African-American actor, Leslie Odom, Jr., who voiced the volatile Aaron Burr in the musical Hamilton, to sing? “Seriously?”

It was 1975 when Parliament-Funkadelic relocated the White House to Chocolate City and nominated for its first Black Occupant President Muhammad Ali, the man who had delivered a series of unforgettable political beat downs to White America in the Nixon era. At least for the first few years, it seemed that Barack Obama’s tenure in Washington would always be a battle between the righteous anger that most Americans believed he must feel inside (remember Luther?) and an outward pose of drama-free, technocratic cool, the bulletproof surface which was all anyone outside a charmed inner circle was allowed to see.

Arguably, one melismatic moment in front of an open microphone in early 2012 was a turning point for Obama. That morning, the Pew Research Center had released the results of a national survey, in which his job approval ratings seemed dangerously low for a politician seeking re-election: only 38% approved of his handling of the economy; a mere 32% predicted his Presidency would be seen as successful. The bright spot was his personal reputation: voters surveyed saw him as trustworthy (61%), felt that he cared about people like them (61%), and overwhelmingly respected him as a man who stood up for his beliefs (75%). In effect, America knew that the brother had soul. But he needed to show it.

The last four years have seen the emergence of a powerfully soulful President, who has been called upon again and again to testify to his faith in the American people and his belief that they can rise to the challenge of racial justice and equality. Not a naturally demonstrative man, he has at times been made to speak, an involuntary instrument of the nation’s need for empathy and healing. His musical interventions and those made on his behalf can express anxiety over his departure and concern over the ways in which his legacy will be narrativized. They also speak volumes about the very constitution of the public sphere in this “most-racial” American moment. Will soul music, as it seemed to do a half-century ago, help us to stay together? What is the alternative?

Moderators
avatar for Shana L. Redmond

Shana L. Redmond

Twitter | | Shana L. Redmond is the author of Anthem: Social Movements and the Sound of Solidarity in the African Diaspora (NYU Press, 2014) and Associate Professor of Musicology in the Herb Alpert School of Music and African American Studies at UCLA. Her current research projects are interested in the science of Black music and the sonic cultures of Afro indebtedness... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Wade Fulton Dean

Wade Fulton Dean

Twitter | | Wade Fulton Dean is a PhD student at the University of California, Los Angeles. His work attends to the intersection of music, race, and politics. A jazz saxophonist and composer, Dean holds an M.M. from the University of the Arts and a B.M. from the University of South Carolina, and taught for several years at the University of Pennsylvania, where he directed the Jazz Studies program. His dissertation explores the relationship between Black expressive, vernacular, and socio-political culture, interrogating the ways that live Soul performance both constructed and organized Black individuals into discursive publics during Civil Rights and Black Power. | | Roundtable: Soul and the Voice of... Read More →
RF

Robert Fink

Twitter | | Robert Fink is Chair of the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music’s program in the Music Industry, and also a past President of IASPM-US. His research focus is on music and culture after 1950, with special interests in musical repetition cultures, the history and analysis of African American popular music, and the politics of contemporary art/dance music. His essay on the cultural politics of... Read More →
avatar for Alisha Gaines

Alisha Gaines

Twitter | | Alisha Gaines is Assistant Professor of English at Florida State University. Her book, Black for a Day: White Fantasies of Race and Empathy is forthcoming from UNC Press (Spring 2017.) Her interdisciplinary teaching interests include African American literature and culture, black queer theory, media and performance studies, narratives of passing, and New Southern studies. She is a life-long fan of Michael Jackson. | | Roundtable: Soul and the Voice of... Read More →
avatar for LaCharles Ward

LaCharles Ward

Twitter | | LaCharles Ward is a PhD candidate in the Rhetoric and Public Culture program in the School of Communication at Northwestern University. He is also the 2016–2017 co-organizer of the Colloquium on Ethnicity and Diaspora (CED), affiliated with the Asian American Studies Program in the Weinberg College of Arts and Science. His dissertation... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Learning Labs MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109
 
Saturday, April 22
 

9:00am

Gender to Sender
Kembrew McLeod, “‘Surrender Your Gender (Return To Sender)’: How Downtown New York’s Underground Musical and Theatrical Scenes Reshaped the Politics of Gender”
Emily Gale, “Soft Rock Masculinities”
Ginger Dellenbaugh, “Hystri-sonic: Music and the Political Struggle over Reproductive Rights”
Jonathan Bogart, “Look at the Boy Doll, Look at the Girl Doll: The Radical Wit and Transgressive Populism of Angolan Divas Titica and Ary”

Moderators
avatar for Sarah Dougher

Sarah Dougher

Twitter | | Sarah Dougher is an adjunct assistant professor in the department of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Portland State University. She is at work on a book about tween girls’ music criticism with colleague Dr. Diane Pecknold. She most recently contributed to Voicing Girlhood in Popular Music, ed. Jacqueline Warwick and Allison Adrian, and Mediated Girlhoods, Volume 2, ed. Mary Celeste Kearney and Morgan Blue... Read More →

Speakers
JB

Jonathan Bogart

Twitter | | Jonathan Bogart is a writer and researcher in Chicago who has been writing about music and cultural history for over a decade. His essays on pop and jazz were selected for the Da Capo Best Music Writing series, and he is an editor emeritus at The Singles Jukebox. He is currently at work on a study of global pop recording between the world wars, and irregularly publishes a zine about 20th-century culture titled Exist Yesterday... Read More →
avatar for Ginger Dellenbaugh

Ginger Dellenbaugh

Ginger Dellenbaugh is a writer, musician, and professor at The New School in New York, where she teaches about music, politics, and the voice.  A trained opera singer, she performed for over a decade in Europe and the United States.  In the fall she will be joining the music department at Yale University. Ginger lives in Vienna, Austria and New York City... Read More →
avatar for Emily Gale

Emily Gale

Twitter | | Emily Gale is a Lecturer in popular music at UC Merced. Her book project, Sentimental Songs for Sentimental People, explores intersections between American popular song and sentimentalism, specifically in 19th century sentimental ballads; the National Barn Dance radio show; the 1960s TV show Sing Along with Mitch; and 1970s soft rock. She has performed with new music ensembles, rock bands, and as a solo pianist, and she is the Director of Arts UC Merced Presents... Read More →
avatar for Kembrew McLeod

Kembrew McLeod

Twitter | | Kembrew McLeod is a Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. He has published and produced several books and documentaries about music and popular culture, and his writing has appeared in the New York Times, Slate, and Rolling Stone. Kembrew’s book Freedom of... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 9:00am - 11:00am
Learning Labs MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

9:00am

Red, White & You
This panel will explore the intersection of country music and symbols of American pride and exceptionalism—you know, flags. Over 90 minutes (four 20-minute talks with one or two questions between each followed by a long Q&A), we’ll stretch from 1959, when Johnny Horton’s “The Battle of New Orleans” became a cross-genre number one, to the mid-2000s, after 9/11 produced a surge of patriotic anthems on the country charts, already a notably friendly place for them. One of those hits, Lee Greenwood’s “God Bless the U.S.A.,” had been the touchstone song of 1984’s Nashville Fan Fair. The 60s and 70s, meanwhile, marked the beginning of Southern rock and outlaw country’s reclamation of the Confederate flag as a rebel signifier, with Charlie Daniels one of the era’s key figures.

David Cantwell, “‘The Battle of New Orleans,’ ‘Johnny Reb,’ and the Civil Rights Movement”
Stephen Thomas Erlewine, “The South's Gonna Do It Again: Charlie Daniels and the Rise of a Rebellious New South”
Michaelangelo Matos, “Fan Fair, Nashville—June 5-8, 1984”
Keith Harris, “Kenny Chesney Hasn’t Forgotten: Nashville’s Nostalgia for a Pre-9/11 Mentality in the Age of the Angry American”

Moderators
avatar for Alfred Soto

Alfred Soto

Twitter | | Alfred Soto is an instructor of journalism and media advisor at Florida International University. He is a contributing editor to The Singles Jukebox and was featured editor of Stylus Magazine. His work has appeared in SPIN, The Miami Herald, Rolling Stone, Slate, MTV, NPR, and The Pitchfork Review. He lives in... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for David Cantwell

David Cantwell

Twitter | | David Cantwell lives in Kansas City, MO where he teaches college English, including the course “Literature of American Popular Music.” He is the author of Merle Haggard: The Running Kind, the coauthor of Heartaches by the Number: Country Music’s 500 Greatest Singles, and a contributor to newyorker.com... Read More →
ST

Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Twitter | | Stephen Thomas Erlewine is a Senior Editor of Pop Music at Tivo, whose database of music information is licensed throughout the internet and can be accessed at Allmusic.com. While at Tivo/Allmusic, he's written thousands of record reviews and biographies. He's also contributed to Rolling Stone, Pitchfork, Vulture, Wondering Sound, and Maura magazine, and has written liner notes for Raven Records and Legacy... Read More →
avatar for Keith Harris

Keith Harris

Twitter | Keith Harris is the current and former music editor of City Pages in Minneapolis. He has written about country music for almost twenty years. He blogs at usefulnoise.wordpress.com and tweets as @usefulnoise.  | | “Kenny Chesney Hasn’t Forgotten: Nashville’s Nostalgia for a Pre-9/11 Mentality in the Age of the Angry... Read More →
MM

Michaelangelo Matos

Twitter | | Michaelangelo Matos is the author of The Underground Is Massive: How Electronic Dance Music Conquered America (Dey Street), Rolling Stone’s number-two music book of 2015, and the Off the Record columnist for Thump. He’s currently at work on a book on the pop landscape of 1984. He lives in St. Paul, Minnesota... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 9:00am - 11:00am
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

9:00am

What Is Politics?
Music and politics. These are both highly contested terms, difficult to define despite the fact that we use them constantly. To place them in relation to each other is to destabilize them even more, and to intensify the issues they raise. This panel interrogates the common-sense understandings of these keywords to locate the politics that inhabit hidden spaces, affective exchanges, aesthetics, postures, and embodiments. Beyond the notion that musical politics are something we know when we see them—or, rather, hear them, we are, following the movements and skeptics subcategory of the CFP, interested in amplifying politics beyond particular artists’ “strategic choices of mannerism, vocality, sound, and style.”

Much scholarly and fan concern with the union of music and politics is centered on social movements. The long Civil Rights Movement is the iconic example of the significance of music’s embrace of politics and politics’ return of that gesture. Photos of open-mouthed, arm-crossed, hand-holding singers like Bernice Johnson and Joan Baez focus the gaze of our cultural memory, representing for many misty-eyed hopes of popular music standing on the side of justice. These are the “Big-P” politics of civic transformation: politics at their most legible. But what of the “little-p” politics that determine how people relate to each other, their social worlds, their ecologies?

Here, we examine the cases in which the positive political effect of music is not so clear-cut; interrogating the assumption that song authorship is the primary space for political work, and emphasizing the fact that the intersection of music and politics is not always hopeful or good. Music has been used as an instrument of torture. Sometimes it sounds political stasis, against popular liberation.

Skepticism is not cynicism, however, and our roundtable embraces the positive critical aspect of that skepticism by asking foundational questions—What do we mean by politics? How do we recognize the presence of politics in music? Is it reducible to the songs sung in support of social movements? Must it refer to the music that inspires previously ignored or ridiculed peoples to stand up and proclaim the beauty and power of their identities, or the plaints that articulate the injustices of state policies or the destructions caused by warring states. Must the intersection of politics and music be based in identity categories? Must the political use of music always have a specific aim in mind? Might love songs have their political ramifications?

This roundtable will approach these questions with no firm answers in mind. Participants come from a series of backgrounds and approaches, from songwriting, to ethnography, to critical theory.

Moderators
avatar for Ali Colleen Neff

Ali Colleen Neff

Twitter | | Ali Colleen Neff is a media anthropologist, cultural theorist, and turntablist whose work arcs from her roots in the Bay Area creative community through her current, engaged ethnographic projects with young media practitioners throughout the Global South. Her project... Read More →
avatar for Barry Shank

Barry Shank

Twitter | | Barry Shank is professor and chair of the Department of Comparative Studies at Ohio State University. He is the author of Dissonant Identities: The Rock ‘n’ Roll Scene in Austin, Texas (1994), A Token of My Affection: Greeting Cards and American Business Culture (200... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Christine Bacareza Balance

Christine Bacareza Balance

Christine Bacareza Balance (Associate Professor, Asian American Studies, UC Irvine) has written on Asian American YouTube artists, Bruno Mars, and Glee’s karaoke aesthetics. She is the author of Tropical Renditions: Making Musical Scenes in Filipino America (Duke University Press, 2016). Her next project, The Afterlives of Martial Law, investigates the sensational politics and fictions of dictatorship. She is one-eighth of the New York-based indie rock band The Jack Lords Orchestra and has been a ceaseless Pop Con fan since 2015. | | Roundtable: What is Politics? | Music and politics. These are both highly contested terms, difficult to define despite the fact that we use them constantly. To place them in relation to each other is to destabilize them even more, and to intensify the issues they raise. This panel interrogates the common-sense understandings of these keywords to locate the politics that inhabit hidden spaces, affective exchanges, aesthetics, postures, and embodiments. Beyond the notion that musical politics are something we know when we see... Read More →
avatar for Maria Elena Buszek 

Maria Elena Buszek 

Maria Elena Buszek is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Colorado Denver. Her recent publications include the books Pin-Up Grrrls: Feminism, Sexuality, Popular Culture and Extra/Ordinary: Craft and Contemporary Art, and contributions to the anthology Punkademics: The Basement Show in the Ivory Tower and exhibition catalog Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia. Her current book project explores the history of art/music hybrids since 1977. | | Roundtable: What is Politics? | Music and politics. These are both highly contested terms, difficult to define despite the fact that we use them constantly. To place them in relation to each other is to destabilize them even more, and to intensify the issues they raise. This panel interrogates the common-sense understandings of these keywords to locate the politics that inhabit hidden spaces, affective exchanges, aesthetics, postures, and embodiments. Beyond the notion that musical politics are something we know when we see... Read More →
avatar for Nadine Hubbs

Nadine Hubbs

Twitter | | Nadine Hubbs is a musicologist, gender-sexuality and class theorist, and cultural historian. Her writings have focused on the Copland-Thomson circle, 1970s disco, Springsteen, Morrissey, Radiohead, and in her latest book, on Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music. She is professor of... Read More →
avatar for Guthrie P. Ramsey, Jr.

Guthrie P. Ramsey, Jr.

Guthrie P. Ramsey, Jr. is the author of Race Music: Black Cultures from Bebop to Hip-Hop, The Amazing Bud Powell: Black Genius, Jazz History and the Challenge of Bebop and African American Music: Grove Music Essentials (Kindle Edition). As the leader of the band Dr. Guy’s MusiQology, he has released three CDs (Y the Q, The Colored Waiting Room and B Eclectic) and is editor and founder of the blog musiqology.com... Read More →
avatar for Bettina Judd

Bettina Judd

Twitter | | Bettina Judd is an Assistant Professor of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington, and is an interdisciplinary writer, artist, and performer whose research focus is on Black women's creative production and our use of visual art, literature, and music to develop Black feminist thought. Her collection of poems on the history of medical experimentation on Black women titled Patient. won the 2013 Black Lawrence Press Hudson Book Prize. | | Roundtable: What is Politics? | Music and politics. These are both highly contested terms, difficult to define despite the fact that we use them constantly. To place them in relation to each other is to destabilize them even more, and to intensify the issues they raise. This panel interrogates the common-sense understandings of these keywords to locate the politics that inhabit hidden spaces, affective exchanges, aesthetics, postures, and embodiments. Beyond the notion that musical politics are something we know when we see... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 9:00am - 11:00am
JBL Theater MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

11:15am

Bad Behavior
Maura Johnston, “Shit Fuck Satan Death Sex Drugs Rape: Hard Rockers' Anti-PMRC Broadsides And The Politics Lurking Beneath”
Stephen M. Deusner, “The Drive-By Truckers, Buford Pusser, and the Politics of Booze”
Claire Lobenfeld, “Nasty Women: When Vulgarity in Rap Music is Liberation Language”

Moderators
avatar for David Greenwald

David Greenwald

Twitter | | David Greenwald is the Oregonian's music critic and the founder of Rawkblog. He's also contributed to Rolling Stone, Billboard, and the Los Angeles Times, and is a three-time SXSW panelist... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Stephen M. Deusner

Stephen M. Deusner

Twitter | | A native of McNairy County, Tennessee, Stephen M. Deusner studied fiction writing at Rhodes College before devoting his efforts to nonfiction and criticism. He has written about music, film, books, and Southern culture for 20 years, and his work appears regularly in Uncut, No Depression, Pitchfork, the Bluegrass Situation, Bandcamp Daily, and American Songwriter, among other print and online publications. He currently lives in Bloomington, Indiana... Read More →
MJ

Maura Johnston

Twitter | | Maura Johnston is a writer and editor who teaches at Boston College. She has written for The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Time, Billboard, and Rolling Stone; her byline also appeared in a number of publications that have succumbed to 21st century industry tumult. She lives in Boston... Read More →
CL

Claire Lobenfeld

Twitter | | Claire Lobenfeld is a music journalist and culture critic based in Los Angeles. She is an editor at music discovery and tech site FACT Magazine and previously held staff positions at the now-defunct longform music site Wondering Sound, as well as at Complex Magazine and Stereogum. Covering pop, rap, and... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 11:15am - 12:45pm
JBL Theater MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

11:15am

Ragtime and Tin Pan Alley
Daniel Goldmark, “Rust Belt Alley: Cleveland as Popular Song Nexus”
David Gilbert,“Ragging Uplift in the Hotel Marshall: The Politics of Black Respectability and White Reformers in Ragtime Era NYC”
Amalia Mallard, “Jim Crow’s Ha! Black Music Laughs Back”

Moderators
avatar for Tyina Steptoe

Tyina Steptoe

Twitter | | Tyina Steptoe is a historian who writes and teaches about race, gender, and culture in the twentieth-century United States. Her book, Houston Bound: Culture and Color in a Jim Crow City, was published by the University of California Press in 2015. She is currently working on a book manuscript that explores race, sexuality, and rhythm and blues music. She works at the University of Arizona in Tucson... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for David Gilbert

David Gilbert

David Gilbert is an assistant professor of U.S. history at Mars Hill University, in Asheville, North Carolina. His manuscript, The Product of Our Souls: Ragtime, Race, and The Birth of the Manhattan Musical Marketplace, was published by UNC Press in 2015 and has received the American Library Association Choice Award for Outstanding Academic... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Goldmark

Daniel Goldmark

Daniel Goldmark is Professor of Music and directs the Center for Popular Music Studies at Case Western Reserve University. He is series editor of the Oxford Music/Media Series, and is the author and/or editor of several books on animation, film, and music. Goldmark also worked as an archivist and music coordinator at... Read More →
avatar for Amalia Mallard

Amalia Mallard

Twitter | | Amalia Mallard is the founder of The Laughing Archive, a repository and critical analysis of laughter in recorded music. With degrees in Political Science and Africana Studies, Ms. Mallard has sought meaningful ways to synthesize her interests in public policy and the arts. Her... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 11:15am - 12:45pm
Demo Lab MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

11:15am

Voice Control
Damon Krukowski, “Music Wants to Be Free, Music Wants to Be Expensive”
Katherine Meizel, “Voice Control: Self-Identity and Agency in the Commodification of a Sampled Voice”
Elena Razlogova, “UnShazammable: Music Outside the Cloud and the Global Copyright Regime”

Moderators
avatar for Tim Quirk

Tim Quirk

Twitter | | Tim Quirk spent more than 10 years as the singer and lyricist for the punk-pop band Too Much Joy. He’s also been a regular contributor to Raygun and The San Francisco Chronicle and overseen the music programming teams for Rhapsody and Google Play. His critical essays have been published in anthologies by the Oxford University Press, Best Music Writing 2010, and the academic journal Popular Music. Tim is currently one half of an electro-pop outfit called Wonderlick... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Damon Krukowski

Damon Krukowski

Twitter | | Damon Krukowski is a musician (Galaxie 500, Damon & Naomi) and writer. His first nonfiction book, The New Analog: Listening and Reconnecting in a Digital World will be published on Record Store Day 2017 by The New Press (New York). He is the recipient of a 2015 Creative Capital / Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant, and in 2016 he was a Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University... Read More →
KM

Katherine Meizel

Katherine Meizel is Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology at Bowling Green State University. She earned her doctorates in ethnomusicology and vocal performance at UCSB. Her book Idolized: Music, Media, and Identity in American Idol was published in 2011; she also wrote about Idol for Slate from 2007-2011. For Oxford University Press, she is currently co-editing a Handbook of Voice Studies, and completing her monograph Multivocality: An Ethnography of Singing on the Borders of Identity... Read More →
avatar for Elena Razlogova

Elena Razlogova

Twitter | | Elena Razlogova is an Associate Professor of History at Concordia University. She is the author of The Listener's Voice: Early Radio and the American Public (2011) and co-editor of “Radical Histories in Digital Culture” issue of the Radical History Review (2013). Her chapter on freeform DJs, recommendation algorithms, and the radio station WFMU was published in... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 11:15am - 12:45pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

11:15am

Soul Politics in the 21st Century
Since its emergence, soul has remained central to the musical manifestations of Black politics. In its early heyday in the 1960s and 1970s, it served as both symbol and mechanism of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements and structured accompanying discussions of class, gender, region and sexuality. Since then, soul has held a treasured yet debated place in the longer history of Black creative genius and cultural resistance. It remains a powerful demonstration of the larger transformations that it accompanied and provoked, but also sometimes symbolizes a supposed degeneracy and downfall (with cries of “who stole the soul?”) that occurred in subsequent decades. Fifty years after its emergence, it seems an opportune moment to assess soul music—of both past and present—in the cultural politics of our tempestuous current moment.
In this roundtable, panelists will offer thoughts on this key and complex question, considering the multivalent, shifting and contested role of soul music and its attendant symbolism in a contemporary context. How do soul legacies inform (and also perhaps distort) understandings of our contemporary moment? How do contemporary soul (or soul-influenced) artists and audiences reimagine, remix, or resist these legacies? Is the declaration of “soul” by contemporary artists like D'Angelo, Anthony Hamilton, or Jazmine Sullivan an attempt to recover a previous era or is it part of an unbroken continuum? Conversely, what is the symbolic status and meaning of Stevie Wonder’s recent Songs in the Key of Life tour or Aretha Franklin’s performance of "Natural Woman" at the 2015 Kennedy Center Honors? Are these throwbacks, reminders, something new, or something else? What are the liberating possibilities of soul in the era of #BlackLivesMatter and “post-hip-hop” sonic experimentation? What are its limitations? Considering a variety of expressions and experiences, the participants will explore these and other topics in both contemporary and historical perspective.

Moderators
avatar for Emily Lordi

Emily Lordi

Twitter | | Emily J. Lordi is the author of Black Resonance: Iconic Women Singers and African American Literature (2013) and a 33 1/3 book on Donny Hathaway Live (2016). Her music and book reviews have appeared on such sites as Slate, The Root, The Fader, and the Los Angeles Review of Books. She is an associate professor of English at UMass-Amherst... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for I. Augustus Durham

I. Augustus Durham

Twitter | | I. Augustus Durham is a fifth-year doctoral candidate in English at Duke University. His dissertation—“Stay Black and Die: On Melancholy and Genius”—spans the 19th century to the contemporary moment, examining the constitution of melancholy in black studies, and how the affect catalyzes genius. He has published articles in Black Camera: An International Film Journal (forthcoming); Palimpsest: A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International; and Journal of Religion and Health. | | Roundtable: Soul Politics in the 21st Century | Since its emergence, soul has remained central to the musical manifestations of Black politics. In its early heyday in the 1960s and 1970s, it served as both symbol and mechanism of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements and structured accompanying discussions of class, gender, region and sexuality. Since then, soul has held a treasured yet debated place in the longer history of Black creative genius and cultural resistance. It remains a powerful demonstration of the larger transformations that it accompanied and provoked, but also sometimes symbolizes a supposed degeneracy and downfall (with cries of... Read More →
avatar for Fredara Mareva Hadley

Fredara Mareva Hadley

Fredara Mareva Hadley is a Visiting Assistant Professor in Ethnomusicology at Oberlin College specializing in African American music and popular music. Hadley has presented work at numerous major conferences and been published in the Encyclopedia of African American Music, Okayplayer, and Urb magazine. In addition to her research, Hadley founded Jooksi, a company that provides music education classes for the public, and music-based walking tours of New York City. | | Roundtable: Trap... Read More →
CL

Charles L. Hughes

Twitter | | Charles L. Hughes is the Director of the Memphis Center at Rhodes College. His first book, Country Soul: Making Music and Making Race in the American South, was released in 2015 by the University North Carolina Press. He has spoken and published widely on race, music, and American History. He is also a musician and songwriter. | | Roundtable: Soul Politics in the 21st Century | Since its emergence, soul has remained central to the musical manifestations of Black politics. In its early heyday in the 1960s and 1970s, it served as both symbol and mechanism of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements and structured accompanying discussions of class, gender, region and sexuality. Since then, soul has held a treasured yet debated place in the longer history of Black creative genius and cultural resistance. It remains a powerful demonstration of the larger transformations that it accompanied and provoked, but also sometimes symbolizes a supposed degeneracy and downfall (with cries of... Read More →
MA

Mark Anthony Neal

Twitter | | Mark Anthony Neal is Professor of African & African American Studies and the founding director of the Center for Arts, Digital Culture and Entrepreneurship at Duke University. He is the author of several books including What the Music Said: Black Popular Music and Black Public Culture (1999), Soul Babies: Black Popular Culture and the Post-Soul Aesthetic (2002), and Looking for Leroy: Illegible Black Masculinities (2013). Neal hosts the webcast Left of Black, and tweets @NewBlackMan. | | Roundtable: Soul Politics in the 21st Century | Since its emergence, soul has remained central to the musical manifestations of Black politics. In its early heyday in the 1960s and 1970s, it served as both symbol and mechanism of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements and structured accompanying discussions of class, gender, region and sexuality. Since then, soul has held a treasured yet debated place in the longer history of Black creative genius and cultural resistance. It remains a powerful demonstration of the larger transformations that it accompanied and provoked, but also sometimes symbolizes a supposed degeneracy and downfall (with cries of... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 11:15am - 12:45pm
Learning Labs MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

1:00pm

Lunch Session: Music and Politics Now Kickoff
Robert Christgau, “Who the Fuck Knows: Covering Music in Drumpfjahr II”
dream hampton, “Shifting the Narrative with Art: Does It Even Fukn Work?”

Note: More informal presentations on music and politics now, including multimedia clips prepared in advance, soapbox rants, and performances, will take place in Sky Church throughout Saturday afternoon. Please contact organizer Eric Weisbard if you would like to be involved or can suggest others who might be.

Moderators
Speakers
RC

Robert Christgau

Twitter | | Robert Christgau has been a rock critic since 1967. He has published five books based on his journalism with two more in the works, as well as the 2015 memoir Going Into the City. He's been awarded Guggenheim, National Arts Journalism Program, and Ferris Fellowships and taught in NYU's Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music from 2005 until the spring of 2016. Christgau keynoted the first Pop Con and has presented at every subsequent edition. His Expert Witness column appears weekly in Noisey... Read More →
DH

dream hampton

Twitter | | dream hampton is a writer, filmmaker and organizer from Detroit. | "Shifting the Narrative with Art: Does It Even Fukn Work?" | I will chart a history of fifteen years of using musicians, artists, semi celebs and bonafide superstars to talk about the utility and the limitations of creating high influencer surrogates to shift narratives, affect existing campaigns, and pass legislation. With marching orders from Stevie Wonder... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Sky Church MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:00pm

Soap Box Presentations
Moderators
Saturday April 22, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Sky Church MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:00pm

Britbeat
This four-person panel will survey the misrepresentation and subtler side of British protest music; our first paper, “Where has all the Protest Music Gone?” serves as an introduction to the ideas that we will be exploring.

Laura Snapes, “Where has all the Protest Music Gone?”
Tom Ewing, "Making Your Mind Up: How Eurovision Caused Brexit"
Hazel Sheffield, “Brexit, Sleaford Mods and Slow Death of a Sixties Dream”
Anna Leszkiewicz “Architecture in Motion: Brutalism in Music Videos”

Moderators
GA

Gina Arnold

Twitter | | Gina Arnold is a Visiting Professor at the Evergreen State College. A former rock critic for a number of well known publications, she received her Ph.D. from Stanford University in Modern Thought & Literature, and is the author of three books about music, "Route 666... Read More →

Speakers
TE

Tom Ewing

Twitter | | Tom Ewing is a researcher and writer who’s worked as a regular columnist for The Guardian and Pitchfork. His long-term project is a history of the UK pop charts by means of reviewing Number One hits. He also works as a political market researcher and his essay on Brexit was published in NY Mag. He presented at Pop Con in 2016, talking about the charts as a vehicle for protest... Read More →
AL

Anna Leszkiewicz

Twitter | | Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture critic for the New Statesman. Based in London, she graduated from Oxford University in 2014, and has also written for the Telegraph, the Guardian, and the Independent. | | “Architecture in Motion: Brutalism in Music Videos” | Brutalist estates are some of the most contested sites in Britain. Aesthetically and politically divisive, are they a towering monument to progressive social ideals, or an ugly, dehumanized concrete jungle? Perhaps none are as contentious as the... Read More →
avatar for Hazel Sheffield

Hazel Sheffield

Twitter | | Hazel Sheffield is a journalist and filmmaker based in London. She is working on a reporting project about local economies, exploring resilience and innovation in British regional communities. She was previously business editor of The Independent and a music and culture journalist for The Guardian, The Telegraph, The Financial Times, and The Economist, among others. She co-produced For The Records, a documentary about the last days of Bleecker... Read More →
LS

Laura Snapes

Twitter | | Laura Snapes is a culture journalist from Cornwall, living in London. Formerly features editor at NME and associate and contributing editor at Pitchfork, she is now a freelance writer for publications such as The Guardian, The Observer, Uncut, The Financial Times, Pitchfork, NPR, MTV News, Buzzfeed, Lenny, Wire, Rookie... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Demo Lab MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:00pm

Politics of Memory
Pete L’Official, "Freedomland”
Carlo Rotella, “The Politics of Dusties: Music and History on the South Side of Chicago”
Jocelyn Brown, "What Self-Care Sounds Like Now: Signifying and Relating through Vocalization and Production Cues"
Megan Drury, “Sonic Reanimation and Checkpoint Audiopolitics in The Iqrit Files”

Moderators
OW

Oliver Wang

Twitter | | Oliver Wang is an associate professor of sociology at CSU-Long Beach and has been the co-editor of the Journal of Popular Music Studies since 2013. He is the author of Legions of Boom: Filipino American Mobile DJ Crew of the S.F. Bay Area and creator of Soul-Sides.co... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jocelyn Brown

Jocelyn Brown

Jocelyn Michelle Brown is a music supervisor, producer, DJ, musician, writer, and conduit. A native of Pensacola, Florida, she has championed music professionally since 1998, starting as a college radio disc jockey at Florida State University. She has worked for independent record labels, music production houses, and advertising agencies, playing records as DJ Clerical Error in her free time. She has recently contributed written and compiled works for Impose and Rookie, and serves as a consultant for International Anthem Recordings. She currently works as the Senior Music Producer for Leo Burnett USA and lives in Chicago... Read More →
avatar for Meghan Drury

Meghan Drury

Twitter | | Meghan Drury recently completed her PhD American Studies at George Washington University. She previously received a master’s degree in ethnomusicology at UC Riverside, and is currently working on a book manuscript based on her dissertation, “Sonic Affinities: The Middle East in the American Popular Music Imaginary... Read More →
PL

Pete L’Official

Twitter | | Pete L’Official in an assistant professor of literature and teaches in the Literature Program in the Division of Languages and Literature at Bard College. He writes about art, sports, music, and culture when he can. | | “Freedomland” | Opened in 1960 and closed by February 1965, Freedomland, U.S.A. was a 205-acre theme park located in the Northeast corner of the Bronx, New York. Eight miles of navigable waterways flowed within its borders and it could accommodate 32,000 visitors at a time, 90,000 in the course of a day... Read More →
avatar for Carlo Rotella

Carlo Rotella

Carlo Rotella is director of the American Studies program at Boston College. His books include Playing in Time, Cut Time, Good With Their Hands, and October Cities. He writes for the New York Times Magazine and his work has also appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's, American Quarterly, The Believer, and The Best American Essays. He is at work on a book about South Shore... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Learning Labs MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:00pm

Post-Dixie Chicks Politics
Country music has a complex relationship with American politics, though it’s often presumed to be anything but, thanks to the long shadows cast by artists stumping for conservative politicians from George Wallace to George W. Bush and responding to tense national moments with brash songs like “The Fightin’ Side of Me” and “Courtesy of the Red, White and Blue (The Angry American).” The change in countrified political discourse has been profound in the era since the Dixie Chicks were blacklisted from country radio because of lead singer Natalie Maines’ offhand criticism of President Bush. This panel will map the past and present landscape from numerous angles.

Nadine Hubbs, “History Lessons: Country Music, American Politics, and the White Working Class”
Chris Willman, “Quiet Time: The Subtlety of Political Discourse in Contemporary Country Music”
Jon Freeman, “Outspoken Outlaws: Hank Williams Jr., Charlie Daniels, John Rich, Justin Moore, and Political Posturing on Country Music’s Fringes”
Jewly Hight, “The Red Scare: Tomatogate and the Politicization of Gender in the Country Music Industry”

Moderators
avatar for David Cantwell

David Cantwell

Twitter | | David Cantwell lives in Kansas City, MO where he teaches college English, including the course “Literature of American Popular Music.” He is the author of Merle Haggard: The Running Kind, the coauthor of Heartaches by the Number: Country Music’s 500 Greatest Singles, and a contributor to newyorker.com... Read More →

Speakers
JF

Jon Freeman

Twitter | | Based in Nashville, Tennessee, Jon Freeman is a staff editor at Rolling Stone Country, the publication's first genre-specific web presence, and has contributed to RollingStone.com, NPR Music, the Nashville Scene, and Vinyl Me Please, among others. Previously he served as the managing editor for Country Weekly magazine and Nashville-based trade publication Music Row... Read More →
avatar for Jewly Hight

Jewly Hight

Twitter | | Writing from Nashville for the past dozen-plus years, music journalist and critic Jewly Hight is an NPR/NPR Music contributor and her work has also appeared in The New York Times, Billboard, Vulture.com, The Oxford American, and elsewhere. She has a Masters from Vanderbilt, where she focused on religion, gender, sexuality, and southern music; published Right By Her Roots: Americana Women and Their Songs in 2011; and is at work on her second book... Read More →
avatar for Nadine Hubbs

Nadine Hubbs

Twitter | | Nadine Hubbs is a musicologist, gender-sexuality and class theorist, and cultural historian. Her writings have focused on the Copland-Thomson circle, 1970s disco, Springsteen, Morrissey, Radiohead, and in her latest book, on Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music. She is professor of... Read More →
CW

Chris Willman

Twitter | | Chris Willman is a Los Angeles-based writer for Billboard and a former music critic for Entertainment Weekly. For his 2005 book Rednecks and Bluenecks: The Politics of Country Music, Willman interviewed everyone from Jimmy Carter to Sean Hannity and surveyed dozens of performers on both sides of the... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 2:00pm - 4:00pm
JBL Theater MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:00pm

Protest Music in History
From the Song of Solomon to Jay-Z’s “Anthem,” short musical narratives have a way of crystallizing and galvanizing change. You can trace their influence in the way single compositions flow across time and space, from antiquity to modernity, from the church to the streets, from the labor movement to the women’s movement. The papers in “Songs of Freedom: Protest Music in History” will provide close listenings, if you will, to tunes that have played key roles in various protest movements. They will be written from the perspectives of journalism, sociology, American studies, artistry, musicology, and fandom, and will cover spirituals, reggae, folk, punk, and rock en Español.

Donna Gaines, “Superflumina Babylonis: The Career of a Song Over Time”
Shana L. Redmond, “Everybody’s Protest Genre”
Solvej Schou, “Killing in the Name: L.A. Chicano 1990s Protest Music at Highland Park’s Centro de Regeneración”
Evelyn McDonnell, “The Rebel Girls: From Joe Hill to Bikini Kill”

Moderators
Speakers
DG

Donna Gaines

Donna Gaines has written for Rolling Stone, MS, the Village Voice, Spin, Newsday, and Salon. Her work has been published in underground fanzines, numerous trade and scholarly collections, professional journals and textbooks. Subjects have included music, tattoos, youth, guns, pornography, TV talk shows, suburbia, spirituality, gender culture, technology, and intergenerational love. Gaines has a PhD in Sociology, and a Masters degree in Social Work. An international expert on youth violence and culture, she is the author of Teenage Wasteland: Suburbia's Dead End Kids, and A Misfit's Manifesto: The Spiritual; Journey of a Rock... Read More →
avatar for Evelyn McDonnell

Evelyn McDonnell

Twitter | | Evelyn McDonnell has written or coedited six books, from Rock She Wrote: Women Write about Rock, Pop and Rap to Queens of Noise: The Real Story of the Runaways. A longtime journalist, she has been a pop culture writer at The Miami Herald and a senior editor at The Village Voice. Her writing has appeared in publications including the Los Angeles Times, Ms., Rolling Stone, The New York Times, Spin, Travel... Read More →
avatar for Shana L. Redmond

Shana L. Redmond

Twitter | | Shana L. Redmond is the author of Anthem: Social Movements and the Sound of Solidarity in the African Diaspora (NYU Press, 2014) and Associate Professor of Musicology in the Herb Alpert School of Music and African American Studies at UCLA. Her current research projects are interested in the science of Black music and the sonic cultures of Afro indebtedness... Read More →
avatar for Solvej Schou

Solvej Schou

Twitter | | Hollywood born and raised Solvej Schou is a Pasadena, California-based writer, journalist and musician. Solvej’s articles have been published by The Associated Press, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Billboard, and other outlets, and she is a former AP staff writer and Entertainment Weekly senior staff writer. Her AP first-person story about auditioning for American Idol was published in Da Capo book Best Music Writing 2008, and she's interviewed artists including Aretha Franklin, Brian Wilson, Ringo Starr, Karen O, Flea, Tyga, Katy Perry, Chrissie Hynde, and Patti Smith. Solvej has a... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:30pm

The Combahee River Collective Mixtape: Black Feminist Sonic Dissent Then & Now

This soapbox session marks the 40th anniversary of the Combahee River Collective Statement, the radical Black feminist manifesto completed in 1977 that laid out key tenets of intersectional theory and reform.  Our aim is to draw on the statement to build sonic and visual archives that enable us to speak to and through this present moment of danger, while also summoning the spirit of the original document and the collaborative intellectual, social and political labor that led to its creation. With help from the work of musicians ranging from the Knowles Sisters, Nina Simone, Labelle and f.k.a. twigs to visual artists such as Carrie Mae Weems and the L.A. rebellion filmmakers, we propose turning the statement into an interactive document that continues to contribute to ongoing efforts to bridge past, present and future Black feminisms. This session will call for audience participation. We invite conference presenters and attendees, museum visitors, local students and activists to join with us to build on the manifesto’s cogent wisdom and direction and to listen along with us to the new knowledges we might yet find together by way of music and image.


Speakers
DB

Daphne Brooks

Daphne A. Brooks has never missed an EMP conference in its 15 years of existence.  Brooksis professor of African American Studies, Theater Studies, American Studies, and Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies at Yale University, and she is the author of Bodies in Dissent:  Spectacular Performances of Race and Freedom... Read More →
KK

Kara Keeling

Kara Keeling is a professor of Cinema and Media Studies in the School of Cinematic Arts and of American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Souther California. She is the author of "The Witch’s Flight: The Cinematic, the Black Femme, and the Image of Common Sense" (Duke University Press, 2007) as well as numerous articles on queer and black feminist theories. Along with Josh Kun, Prof. Keeling is also the editor of the... Read More →
JS

Jacqueline Stewart

Twitter | | Jacqueline Stewart is a professor in the Department of Cinema and Media Studies and the College at the University of Chicago.  She is the author of "Migrating to the Movies: Cinema and Black Urban Modernity" (University of California Press, 2005), and co-editor of "L.A. Rebellion: Creating a New Black Cinema" (University of California Press, 2015). She directs the South Side Home Movie Project, and is curator of... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Sky Church MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

4:15pm

Cold War
Marilisa Merolla, “A Sonic Weapon. Cold War, Hot Rhythms in the Mediterranean United States of Blues (1954–1989)”
Tom Smucker, “The Night Mike Love Sang ‘California Girls’ at the Folk Rock Response to a Fascist Coup”
Lauren Rever, “Erich, Honey! How Udo Lindenberg's "Sonderzug" Made its Way into East German Politics”

Moderators
avatar for Steve Waksman

Steve Waksman

Steve Waksman is Professor of Music and Sylvia Dlugasch Bauman Professor of American Studies at Smith College. His publications include the books Instruments of Desire: The Electric Guitar and the Shaping of Musical Experience (1999) and This Ain’t the Summer of Love: Conflict and Crossover in Heavy Metal and Punk (2009). Currently, he is writing a new book on the cultural history of live music and performance in the U.S., tentatively titled, Live Music in America: A History, 1850-2000... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Marilisa Merolla

Marilisa Merolla

Marilisa Merolla is associate professor in Contemporary History at La Sapienza Università di Roma. She is the founder and the director of "Music Making History Research Unit" which co-operates with several Universities throughout Europe and United States. Among the numerous international publications, she is the author of... Read More →
avatar for Lauren Rever

Lauren Rever

Lauren Rever is a Master's candidate in American studies at The George Washington University concentrating in museums and material culture. Her interests include American history, material culture, and popular culture. She is especially interested in public history and how history can best be told to and alongside audiences. Lauren received her B.A. from Boston College in 2014 with a major in History and German and spent a year teaching English in Hamburg, Germany... Read More →
avatar for Tom Smucker

Tom Smucker

Tom Smucker has been writing about pop music and politics since Woodstock. He is currently president of the CWA Local 1101 Retired Members Council and an Elder at Middle Collegiate Church, and a long, long time ago was the first and last Marxist-Leninist gossip columnist at the Village Voice... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:15pm - 6:15pm
Demo Lab MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

4:15pm

Girls and Girlhoods
The election of 2016 provided fodder for a renewed public discussion of the harassment and violence experienced by girls and the adult women in their lives, as well as stories of resistance and resilience. Such conversations in the context of electoral politics are important, but they obscure the political significance of cultural sites where girls routinely formulate their identities as girls, that is, as people occupying a particular set of subject positions within social structures characterized by power and inequality. How might we assess the political implications of girls’ musicking? This panel brings together five scholar-teachers whose work engages the political nature of popular music as a site for inquiry, critical dialogue and progressive pedagogy in order to explore how popular pedagogies enacted through music inscribe and describe the political selves of girls (and some women). What do we imagine as political when we hear Black girls engaged in sonic expressions of their political, social, and spiritual selves? When an all-girl band formed at girls’ rock camp repeatedly declares “We’re not a girl band,” what are they saying about the meaning of (post) feminism as a political ideology, of girlhood as a social location, or of their own positions as political or social actors? How can a nostalgic pop counter-history of girls’ performance illuminate political identities? How might girls and women create a political erotics of feminist solidarity through their consumption and interpretation of pop stars like Jenni Rivera? Together, these papers encourage us to reconsider activities often dismissed as private or apolitical in order to recognize girls’ critical and political thinking and their potential as political agents.

Diane Pecknold and Sarah Dougher, “Teaching and Enacting (Post) Feminist Politics at Girls’ Rock Camp and Beyond”
Yessica Garcia Hernandez, “Little Divas in Training: Exploring the Negotiations of Jenni Rivera Girl Fans and their Participation in Intergenerational Fan Cultures”
Jessica L. Robinson, “It Sounds like Music, It Looks like Us: Ritualized Practices of Sounded Expressions”
Alexandra Apolloni, “Here Come the Girls: Nostalgia, Power, and the Politics of Pop History”

Moderators
LL

Lara Langer Cohen

Twitter | | Lara Langer Cohen is Associate Professor of English at Swarthmore College. She is the author of The Fabrication of American Literature: Fraudulence and Antebellum Print Culture and co-editor, with Jordan Alexander Stein, of Early African American Print Culture (both... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alexandra Apolloni

Alexandra Apolloni

Twitter | | Alexandra Apolloni holds a PhD in Musicology from UCLA and is the Program Coordinator at the UCLA Center for the Study of Women. Her writing has appeared in a number of academic and non-academic publications, including Women & Music, Echo: a music-centered journal, The Avid Listener, Hippo Reads, and The Toast. Her current book project examines vocal performances of race and class by young women singers in 1960s Britain... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Dougher

Sarah Dougher

Twitter | | Sarah Dougher is an adjunct assistant professor in the department of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Portland State University. She is at work on a book about tween girls’ music criticism with colleague Dr. Diane Pecknold. She most recently contributed to Voicing Girlhood in Popular Music, ed. Jacqueline Warwick and Allison Adrian, and Mediated Girlhoods, Volume 2, ed. Mary Celeste Kearney and Morgan Blue... Read More →
avatar for Yessica Garcia Hernandez

Yessica Garcia Hernandez

Yessica Garcia Hernandez is a PhD student in the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, San Diego. Her research explores the ways immigrant communities create sonic identities within the genre of Mexican regional music. She uses a Chicana feminist lens to explore the intersections of gender and sexuality among fan clubs and paisa party crews of the late 90s and 2000s. In her dissertation, she particularly explores the popularity and fandom of late Chicana singer Jenni Rivera... Read More →
avatar for Diane Pecknold

Diane Pecknold

Diane Pecknold is an Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Louisville, where she teaches girls’ studies, gender and popular music, and feminist history. She has published extensively on the racial and gender dynamics of country music and is currently working with Sarah Dougher on a book about tween... Read More →
JL

Jessica L. Robinson

Jessica L. Robinson is a doctoral student in Media and Cinema Studies (Institute for Communications Research) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her work, done in community with the SOLHOT collective, focuses on the politics and poetics of the life-making/saving practices of black girlhood. With specific focus on art making legacies of black feminisms, her research and artist practice interrogates black girl creations of soundscapes as well as analog and digital landscapes... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:15pm - 6:15pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

4:15pm

Sounds from the Underground
As a shouty and declarative election season skids to an abrupt halt, we feel the need to retreat from the crude mottos and repeated clichés and phrases of mainstream political speech. We take refuge in sound making practices in a number of different contexts. These practices engage breath, whistles, crowd sounds, yelps, whispers, and squeaks to create sonic landscapes, or what Josh Kun has called audiotopias. By tracking migrant sounds, rebellious non-harmonic convergences, indexical whistles, and the soundscapes of underground dance scenes, we seek a form of sonic fugitivity that orients away from noisy cultural clash and finds refuge in the babble of multilingual speech. While obviously our focus on sound is informed by various theories of music as organized or disorganized noise, and while noisiness itself is not the problem we oppose, we intend to cast noise as an aesthetic practice grounded in a political fantasy of meaningful multivocality. Our papers will orient to the sounds of migration, zapotec whistling, underground dance scenes, and punk background noise. We will conjure world making noise in the grunts, the hoots, the yelps, and the other non-verbal mechanisms that fill the gaps between shouted messages of outrage and the small sounds of change.

Gala Porras-Kim, “Whistling and Language Transfiguration”
Jack Halberstam, “Power in the Darkness—Queer Punk Cultures”
Tim Lawrence, “Multivocal Partying in Early 1980s New York City”
Josh Kun, “Sound of Detention /Music of Escape”

Moderators
avatar for Jason King

Jason King

Twitter | | Jason King, PhD is Associate Professor, Director of Global Studies, and Director of Writing, History & Emergent Media Studies and the founding faculty member at New York University's Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music. A journalist, musician, DJ, and producer, he was the program's first Interim Chair, Associate Chair and Artistic Director. Jason has been teaching classes on popular music history, the music business (marketing/branding), and the social aspects of music technology for many years, as well as teaching at NYU campuses in Singapore and Abu Dhabi and developing study abroad programs in Berlin and Havana. He is the author of The Michael Jackson Treasures, a 2009 Barnes and Noble exclusive biography on the King of Pop, which has been translated in more than seven languages, and a regular contributor to publications like Pitchfork, Billboard, Buzzfeed, Slate, and Vice. He has been an expert witness in copyright infringement cases for Jay Z, Timbaland, Lady Gaga, Madonna, and others, and he has appeared in many music documentaries, including Spike Lee's critically acclaimed Bad 25 and Michael... Read More →

Speakers
JH

Jack Halberstam

Twitter | | Jack Halberstam is a professor of English and Gender Studies at Columbia University. Having just moved from LA to NY, from West to East, Jack is learning to live with the cold again and enjoying the sights and sounds of Brooklyn while writing two new books—one titled Trans* looks at new forms of gendered embodiment and the other titled Wild Things explores the chaotic, the untamed and the anarchic for alternative models of living, thinking and desiring... Read More →
JK

Josh Kun

Twitter | | Josh Kun is Professor in the USC Annenberg School and Director of The Popular Music Project at The Norman Lear Center. His edited collection on the Latin American music of Los Angeles is forthcoming from UC Press as part of the 2017 Getty initiative Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA. His project Hit Parade will debut with SFMOMA and the San Francisco Public Library in 2017. He is co-editor of the book series, Refiguring American Music, for Duke University Press... Read More →
avatar for Tim Lawrence

Tim Lawrence

Twitter | | Tim Lawrence is the author of Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970-79; Hold On to Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Party Scene, 1973-92; and Life and Death on the New York Dance Floor, 1980-83. He is a professor of Cultural Studies at the University of East London. He co-founded the Centre for Cultural Studies Research and Lucky Cloud Sound System... Read More →
GP

Gala Porras-Kim

Gala Porras-Kim was born in Bogotá, Colombia, in 1984 and works primarily with drawing and sculpture. Porras-Kim’s academic background includes an MFA in art from California Institute of the Arts, as well as a BA in art and Latin American studies and an MA in Latin American studies from the University of California, Los Angeles. Her solo exhibitions include For Prospective Rock/Artifact Projection (2015) and The Mute Object and Ancient Stories of Today (2013), both at Commonwealth... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:15pm - 6:15pm
JBL Theater MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

4:15pm

Chocolate Cities
“We didn’t get our 40 acres and a mule, but we got you C[hocolate] C[ity],” George Clinton declares victoriously on the title track of Parliament Funkadelic’s 1975 Chocolate City album. Rather than wait on unfulfilled political promises, Black Americans were occupying urban and previously white space in massive numbers, their movement and increasing political power embodied on the track by multiple but complementary melodies. Bass and piano take turns keeping the beat and beginning new melodies, saxophones speak, a synthesizer marks a new era, and a steady high-hat ensures the funk stays in rhythm. The Parliament, its own kind of funky democratic government, chants “gainin’ on ya!” as Clinton announces the cities that Black Americans have turned or will soon turn into “CC’s”: Newark, Gary, Los Angeles, Atlanta, and New York. Parliament’s “Mothership Connection” public service announcement is broadcast live from the capitol, the capital of chocolate cities, Washington, DC, where “they still call it the White House, but that’s a temporary condition.”

Spurred on by postwar suburbanization, by 1975, the chocolate city and its concomitant “vanilla suburbs” were a familiar racialized organization of space and place. The triumphant takeover tenor of Chocolate City may seem paradoxical in retrospect, as black people inherited neglected space, were systematically denied resources afforded to whites, and were entering an era of mass incarceration. Still, for Parliament, like for many other Black Americans, chocolate cities were a form of reparations, and were and had been an opportunity to make something out of nothing. For generations, these chocolate cities—black neighborhoods, places on the other side of the tracks, the bottoms—had been the primary locations of the Freedom struggle; the sights and sounds of Black art and black oppression; and the container for the combined ingredients of pain, play, pleasure and protest that comprise the Black experience.

Four decades after Chocolate City, including eight years of the first African American president, what is the status of Clinton’s Afro-futurist vision of the chocolate city, and how does that vision play out in current music about and situated in chocolate cities? What is the sonic legacy of the Chocolate City? What does a chocolate city sound like today, or in many cases, what does a gentrified chocolate city sound like? And how does new post-place and post-genre music signal a rejection, revision, and/or continuation of Parliament’s Afro-futurist urban politics? This panel explores these questions and the relationship between the city, politics, and music with a discussion between Hip-Hop artists and scholars from three of America’s chocolate cities: Memphis, Brooklyn, and Philadelphia.

Moderators
avatar for Marcus Anthony Hunter

Marcus Anthony Hunter

Twitter | | Marcus Anthony Hunter is the coauthor of the new book Chocolate Cities, which will be published by the University of California Press in Fall 2017. Having received his PhD in sociology from Northwestern in 2011, Hunter is the coauthor of the award-winning books Black Citymakers (Oxford University Press, 2013) and This... Read More →
avatar for Zandria F. Robinson

Zandria F. Robinson

Zandria F. Robinson writes on Southern hip-hop, the urban South, and Black feminist themes in the work of Black women popular culture artists. Her book, This Ain’t Chicago: Race, Class, and Regional Identity in the Post-Soul South is an ethnographic and pop examination of the intersections of race, class, gender, and region in Black identity. Robinson teaches sociology at Rhodes College, blogs at... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Takima Darnell

Takima Darnell

Twitter | | Takima Darnell known as Phya Inc, is a Female MC and Event Curator from Brooklyn, New York. Phya Inc grew up in Bed-Stuy during hip-hop's golden era developing her lyrical skills in lunch rooms, cyphers, and open mics. Rapping is an art form that Phya utilized to express her social and political views as a young woman. A skill that she says has cultivated her confidence and cultural awareness. Often compared to her early influences in Hip-Hop music MC Lyte and Queen Latifah, she also was inspired by Salt N Pepa. However, she gives all of her credit to her Mother and Grandmother for introducing her to Motown. Phya has taken her politically charged lyrics, raspy voice and feminine power to platforms to Atlanta, Philadelphia and even France. In 2015 and 2016, Phya Inc was invited to share her works with students at UCLA where she guest-lectured a sociology course discussing gentrification and intersectionality. Phya Inc is currently working on developing a youth program for girls in Philadelphia that will utilize hip-hop/rap as a vehicle to develop self-esteem, confidence and social skills and cultural awareness. | | Roundtable: Chocolate Cities... Read More →
MH

Max Hunter

Max Hunter is an artist, musician, and actor from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. On December 3rd, 2015, he released his first album entitled (blackART). Since its release, (blackART) has charted multiple times on the U.S. hip-hop charts, being #117 on the top #150 albums at the time of release. It was also one of the top hip-hop pre-orders on iTunes during its Pre-Ordering period. It has been reviewed by multiple hip-hop bloggers across the country, and has been rated between 4-5 stars on average. As of October 2016, it has been streamed in 30 countries around the world, and has a combined 12,000+ streams worldwide. | | Roundtable: Chocolate Cities... Read More →
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Marco Pavé

Twitter | | Marco Pavé is Project Pat meets KRS-ONE. Spitting an urban country consciousness with a confidence that could only emerge from coming of age as a Muslim Milllennial in North Memphis. As a rapper and songwriter, Marco Pavé appeals to a diversity of rap enthusiasts, from purists to radio lovers to hipsters, with a soulful style of hip-hop storytelling and community engagement that appeals to racial and geographically diverse millennial audiences... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:15pm - 6:15pm
Learning Labs MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

5:00pm

Soap Box Presentations
Moderators
avatar for Evelyn McDonnell

Evelyn McDonnell

Twitter | | Evelyn McDonnell has written or coedited six books, from Rock She Wrote: Women Write about Rock, Pop and Rap to Queens of Noise: The Real Story of the Runaways. A longtime journalist, she has been a pop culture writer at The Miami Herald and a senior editor at The Village Voice. Her writing has appeared in publications including the Los Angeles Times, Ms., Rolling Stone, The New York Times, Spin, Travel... Read More →

Saturday April 22, 2017 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Sky Church MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

6:15pm

Voicing Change: The Artist and the Political Life
"Voicing Change: The Artist and the Political Life," features Tanya Tagaq, Meredith Graves (vocalist for Perfect Pussy and MTV News anchor), and Mike Hadreas (Perfume Genius). This event will begin with a performance by Tanya Tagaq.

Moderators
avatar for Ann Powers

Ann Powers

Twitter | | Ann Powers is a critic and correspondent for NPR Music. She has worked for many publications including the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, the Village Voice, and SPIN. She was a founding editor of the SF Weekly and, in the early 2000s, worked as a curator at S... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Meredith Graves

Meredith Graves

Meredith Graves is a musician and journalist originally from upstate New York. After fronting several mediocre punk bands she accidentally became a freelance journalist, writing for publications like Pitchfork, the Guardian, the Village Voice and more. At some point she became the host of MTV News, where she works... Read More →
avatar for Mike Hadreas

Mike Hadreas

Perfume Genius is the nom de poster-wraith of Mike Hadreas, whose 2014 breakout album Too Bright—called “awe-inspiring, magnificent” by NPR—marked a musical and performative leap that sounds unlike anything before or since. With his fourth album No Shape, he goes even further, merging church music, makeout music... Read More →
avatar for Tanya Tagaq

Tanya Tagaq

Twitter | | Tanya Tagaq’s music is like nothing you’ve heard before. The Arctic-born artist is an improvisational performer, avant-garde composer and experimental recording artist whose most recent album, Retribution, has disrupted the music world in Canada and beyond with its powerfully original vision. Tagaq contorts elements of punk, metal, and electronica into a complex and contemporary sound that begins in breath, a communal and fundamental phenomenon... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 6:15pm - 8:00pm
Sky Church MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109
 
Sunday, April 23
 

9:00am

Sounds of Possibility
Sound is a catalyst for emotion and action. Musicians and composers are agents who bring a listening public into existence by using specific techniques to sculpt the properties of sound. They provide the grounds for sociality, or rather they are architects of collaboration on the shared ground of sound. This panel seeks out sounds of possibility, asking how sound can open new conditions of possibility for black Americans subject to silencing and constraint. Each panelist starts with a searching question. How does the sound of hip-hop make room for past and present narratives of southern blackness? For Regina N. Carter, growing up in 1990s Albany, Georgia, reverend Martin Luther King Jr. and rapper Pastor Troy were equally yoked in her imagination as touchstones of black southernness. How can composers respond to the realities of our current social struggles through music in a meaningful way? In Courtney Bryan’s compositions Sanctum and Yet Unheard, the stories and sounds of black women victims of police brutality inform her creative process. What might a feeling-as-epistemology sound like? Ashon Crawley hears the Hammond B-3 musician of Black Sacred Music as a sculptor, shaping relations with the congregation through desired efficaciousness. Can the sound of a musical instrument demand action? In a reconsideration of Louis Armstrong, Matt Sakakeeny suggests that virtuosic trumpet playing was a form of radical aesthetics that transformed modern blackness. In all of these different instances, sound does not simply represent social processes but actively shapes them, prompting each panelist to reevaluate music and politics.

Matt Sakakeeny, “The Radical Aesthetics of Louis Armstrong”
Courtney Bryan, “#SayHerName: Sounds of Misery and Sanctuary “
Ashon Crawley, “Sculpting Sound”
Regina N. Bradley, “When the Heroes Eventually Die: Creating Sonic Genealogies of Southern Black Protest”

Moderators
CL

Charles L. Hughes

Twitter | | Charles L. Hughes is the Director of the Memphis Center at Rhodes College. His first book, Country Soul: Making Music and Making Race in the American South, was released in 2015 by the University North Carolina Press. He has spoken and published widely on race, music, and American History. He is also a musician and songwriter. | | Roundtable: Soul Politics in the 21st Century | Since its emergence, soul has remained central to the musical manifestations of Black politics. In its early heyday in the 1960s and 1970s, it served as both symbol and mechanism of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements and structured accompanying discussions of class, gender, region and sexuality. Since then, soul has held a treasured yet debated place in the longer history of Black creative genius and cultural resistance. It remains a powerful demonstration of the larger transformations that it accompanied and provoked, but also sometimes symbolizes a supposed degeneracy and downfall (with cries of... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Regina N. Bradley

Regina N. Bradley

Twitter | | Regina N. Bradley is Assistant Professor of African American Literature at Armstrong State University in Savannah, GA. She writes about race and sound, hip-hop, and the post-Civil Rights Black American South. Her first book, Chronicling Stankonia: OutKast and the Rise of the Hip-hop South, is forthcoming from University of North Carolina Press. She can be reached at redclayscholar.com or via Twitter @redclayscholar. | | Roundtable: Trap... Read More →
avatar for Courtney Bryan

Courtney Bryan

Twitter | | Courtney Bryan is “a pianist and composer of panoramic interests” (New York Times). Her music is in conversation with various musical genres, including jazz and other types of experimental music, as well as traditional gospel, spirituals, and hymns. Her work has been presented in a wide range of venues, including Lincoln Center, Miller Theatre, The Stone, and Blue Note Jazz Club. Bryan is an Assistant Professor of Music at Tulane University's Newcomb Department of Music. courtneybryan.com. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth Leitzell... Read More →
avatar for Ashon Crawley

Ashon Crawley

Twitter | | Ashon Crawley is Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies at University of California, Riverside. His research and teaching experiences are in the areas of Black Studies, Performance Theory and Sound Studies, Philosophy and Theology, Black Feminist and Queer theories. His first book project, Blackpentecostal Breath: The Aesthetics of Possibility is an investigation of aesthetics and performance as modes of collective, social imaginings otherwise (Fordham University Press... Read More →
avatar for Matt Sakakeeny

Matt Sakakeeny

Matt Sakakeeny is Associate Professor of Music at Tulane University. He is the author of Roll With It: Brass Bands in the Streets of New Orleans and co-editor of the volume Keywords in Sound. A sometime journalist, he has contributed to Oxford American, NPR’s All Things Considered, and other news outlets. In New Orleans, Matt is a board member for Roots of Music and the Dinerral Shavers Educational... Read More →


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:00am - 11:00am
Learning Labs MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

9:00am

Well-Meaning Sentiments
Critique of well-meaning but insipid political music has recurred from "Ballad for Americans" to "We are the World," though each of these examples has had its defenders, too: Michael Denning seeing Popular Front urban coalition, Robert Christgau black middle-of-the-road voices. Another way to frame this is as the relationship between the sentimental and the vernacular: between Uncle Tom's Cabin or Show Boat (or Lauren Berlant) and minstrelsy or blues (or Eric Lott), between Kiss singing "Detroit Rock City" and Kiss singing "Beth," between Chuck Berry hitting with "Johnny B. Goode" but wishing he could hit with a Nat Cole ballad. Often, sentimentality is framed culturally as feminine, middle class, white, insincere, or overly sincere, where the vernacular is framed as masculine, working class, black, and amoral. How does this play out when sentimentality enters political music, from "God Bless America" to "This Land Is Your Land," from Macklemore to Hamilton?

Gus Stadler, “Woody Guthrie, Sentimentalism, and the Idea of Cultural Politics”
Karen Tongson, “The Indigo Girls and the Politics of Lesbian Sentimentality”
Pamela Fox, “Born to (Re)Write: Rethinking the Gendered and Classed Political Imaginary of Rock Music Memoir in Born to Run”
Eric Weisbard, “Anthems and Angularity: Sentimental/Vernacular Divides In Music Writing”

Moderators
avatar for Emily Gale

Emily Gale

Twitter | | Emily Gale is a Lecturer in popular music at UC Merced. Her book project, Sentimental Songs for Sentimental People, explores intersections between American popular song and sentimentalism, specifically in 19th century sentimental ballads; the National Barn Dance radio show; the 1960s TV show Sing Along with Mitch; and 1970s soft rock. She has performed with new music ensembles, rock bands, and as a solo pianist, and she is the Director of Arts UC Merced Presents... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Pamela Fox

Pamela Fox

Pamela Fox is Professor of English at Georgetown University specializing in working-class lit. and culture as well as feminist and cultural theory. She is the author of Class Fictions: Shame and Resistance in the British Working-Class Novel, 1890-1945; Natural Acts: Gender, Race, And Rusticity in Country Music; the Critical Introduction to Ethel Carnie Holdsworth's 1917 novel Helen of Four Gates; co-editor of Old Roots, New Routes: The Cultural Politics of Alt.Country Music. Recent scholarship addresses transracial/ transnational adoption memoirs and country music and sexuality for the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Country Music... Read More →
avatar for Gus Stadler

Gus Stadler

Twitter | | Gus Stadler is Associate Professor of English at Haverford College. He is the author of a book, Troubling Minds: The Cultural Politics of Genius in the U. S. 1840-1890 and numerous articles on American literature and culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. From 2010 to 2013 he co-edited the Journal of Popular Music Studies with Karen Tongson. His current book project is tentatively titled Woody Guthrie and the Intimate Life of the... Read More →
avatar for Karen Tongson

Karen Tongson

Twitter | | Karen Tongson is Associate Professor of English and Gender Studies at University of Southern California, and the author of Relocations: Queer Suburban Imaginaries (NYU Press). Her work has appeared in numerous venues in print and online. She has a forthcoming book with ForEdge Press... Read More →
avatar for Eric Weisbard

Eric Weisbard

Twitter | | Eric Weisbard is Associate Professor of American Studies at the University of Alabama, organizer of the Pop Conference, editor of three MoPOP (formerly EMP Museum) anthologies (This Is Pop,Listen Again, and Pop When the World Falls Apart) and the Spin Alternative Record Guide, and author of Use Your Illusion in the 33 1/3 series and Top 40 Democracy: The Rival Mainstreams of American Music, which won the IASPM-US Woody Guthrie Prize for best book... Read More →


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:00am - 11:00am
JBL Theater MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

11:15am

Performing Politics
This panel is interested in the unsung race, gender, and sexual politics that bodies articulate in popular venues that are not intended as expressly political or critical cultural spaces. Focusing on a diverse set of entertainers from the genres of blues, R&B, and pop, these three presentations draw from performance studies, queer of color critique, and women of color feminisms’ shared attunement to the corporeal and the affective to understand the performing body’s role on the popular stage. The papers of this panel explore the performing body as an index of unspoken historical moments and cultural feelings, prompting us to ask: how do these artists enable us to envision different modes of engagement with the realm of the popular? Elaine Kathryn Andres illustrates the way in which Afro Filipina singer Sugar Pie DeSanto’s ahead-of-her-time performance of the “sassy, raunchy, [and] saucy” re-narrate the expectations of African American and Filipino corporeality and challenge assumptions of womanhood, sexuality, and urban life in the 1960s. Jessica Pruett’s analysis of One Direction inspired drag king ensemble Every Direction examines the group’s engagement with both lesbian subcultures and boy band fan communities, troubling the separation of lesbian identity from popular culture. Brady James Forrest brings together melancholia and Gallant’s live performance at LA Pride in the aftermath of the shooting at Pulse nightclub to show how dancing acts as a type of melancholia, a way of attending to loss and violence before moving forward.

Elaine Kathryn Andres, “’Use What You Got’: Sugar Pie DeSanto’s Bodily Performance of Pleasure”
Jessica Pruett, “I’m With the (Boi) Band: One Direction and Lesbian Fan Culture”
Brady James Forrest, “Drake, Gallant, and Pulse: Melancholic Dancing and the Refusal to Run”

Moderators
SR

Sonnet Retman

Sonnet Retman is Associate Professor and Associate Chair of American Ethnic Studies at the University of Washington. She is the author of Real Folks: Race and Genre in the Great Depression (Duke 2011). Her work on race, gender and genre has appeared in journals such as American L... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Elaine Kathryn Andres

Elaine Kathryn Andres

Twitter | | Elaine Kathryn Andres is a third year doctoral student in the program in Culture and Theory at UC Irvine. Her research examines the nexus of race, gender, sexuality, and place in popular music and its visual culture. Her current work focuses on the performance of racial, ethnic, and economic encounter embodied in the work of popular Afro Asian American crossover artists... Read More →
avatar for Brady James Forrest

Brady James Forrest

Twitter | | Brady James Forrest is a PhD student in the Department of English at the George Washington University. Broadly, his research explores visual culture with an attention to crip/queer embodiment and relationality. His current work focuses on a crip/queer phenomenological approach to liminal spaces as a site for world building... Read More →
JP

Jessica Pruett

Jessica Pruett is a third year doctoral student in Culture and Theory at the University of California, Irvine. Her research interests include transnational queer and feminist theory, political economy, and mass culture. Her work examines lesbian relationships to mass culture, focusing in particular on lesbian engagement with popular culture... Read More →


Sunday April 23, 2017 11:15am - 12:45pm
Learning Labs MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

11:15am

Freedom Sounds in a National Museum
In 2016, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture opened on the National Mall in Washington, DC. One of the museum’s permanent exhibits, Musical Crossroads, tells the dynamic and complex story of African American music from its earliest manifestations to the present day. Though the exhibition serves to celebrate the vivid joys and universal spirit of music, the stories told within also explore the social power of African American music, framing the production and consumption of black music as an expression of cultural solidarity and an agent of collective resistance, mobilization, and social change. Through the presentation of artifacts and the exhibition’s written, audio, and visual content, visitors engage with the history of African American music, innovation and performance to develop a broader understanding of black music’s role in sonically narrating stories of cultural survival, transformation and representation, as well as the crucial role that politics and identity play in determining the aesthetic and cultural impact of African American music production on the domestic and global stage. Celebrating the social power of African American music and its unique ability to unify and to sustain hope in moments of despair and inspiration, Musical Crossroads explores how black musical expression is rooted in the social and political struggles of African Americans, with the goal of illustrating how cultural expressions of protest and affirmation have mobilized the freedom dreams and liberation projects of people worldwide.
This roundtable panel will discuss how the politics of performance, identity, futurism, and social change is demonstrated and displayed in the museum’s exhibition and presented to a national audience. The roundtable participants will feature the exhibit’s curator and historians and will highlight objects both on display and from the museum’s collections that speak to music’s political power, its value to communities, and calculable ability to affect social change. Dwan Reece will highlight acquisitions related to the 5th Dimension as part of a larger effort to deconstruct the demonstrated ways that music, as subject and process, transcends constructed boundaries of genres and race and how audiences respond to these breaches of compartmentalization in ways that support and undermine an integrationist agenda. Kevin Strait will explore other acquisitions such as the P-Funk Mothership and the ways objects physically symbolize grander, centralized notions of freedom, and liberation. And using Nona Hendryx’s costume from LaBelle’s 1974 performance at the Metropolitan Opera House, Timothy Anne Burnside will explore LaBelle’s transition from singing ballads in the 60s female group model to voicing their ideas about politics, identity, sexuality, the erotic, and empowerment of black women through their futuristic costumes and elaborate stage performances, creating a new platform for women in popular music. The roundtable will also serve as an opportunity for panelists and session participants to converse about the various ways that music and politics play out in the overall narrative of African American music history and can be explored in a national museum.

Moderators
avatar for Regina N. Bradley

Regina N. Bradley

Twitter | | Regina N. Bradley is Assistant Professor of African American Literature at Armstrong State University in Savannah, GA. She writes about race and sound, hip-hop, and the post-Civil Rights Black American South. Her first book, Chronicling Stankonia: OutKast and the Rise of the Hip-hop South, is forthcoming from University of North Carolina Press. She can be reached at redclayscholar.com or via Twitter @redclayscholar. | | Roundtable: Trap... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Timothy Anne Burnside

Timothy Anne Burnside

Twitter | | Timothy Anne Burnside is a Museum Specialist at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. She works with artists and others to build collections and develop exhibitions that offer accurate and rich representations of African American history and cultural expression. Timothy holds an M.A. in Museum Studies from Johns Hopkins, and studied History, English, and Music Performance at Lawrence University. | | Roundtable: Freedom Sounds in a National Museum | In 2016, the... Read More →
avatar for Dwan Reece

Dwan Reece

Twitter | | Dwan Reece is Curator of Music and Performing Arts at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History Culture. Along with building the museum’s collections and developing programs, she served as co-curator of the museum’s grand opening music festival, Freedom Sounds, and curator of the... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Strait

Kevin Strait

Twitter | | Kevin Strait is a Museum Specialist at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History Culture. He has worked closely with curators on the research, development and acquisition of objects for several of the museum’s permanent exhibitions. Kevin received his PhD in American Studies at the George Washington University. | | Roundtable: Freedom Sounds in a National Museum | In 2016, the... Read More →


Sunday April 23, 2017 11:15am - 12:45pm
JBL Theater MoPOP, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109